Triumph 675 Forums banner
101 - 105 of 105 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Thanks!

Thanks for the write up OP. The directions came on a CD-ROM but my MacBook Air doesn't have a drive so I used nothing but this write up on my 2012 675r and took all the guess work out of it!

Thanks again and we shall see how it holds up at Chuck Walla on the 7th!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I am stuck at ~1.5mm with my install. Removing the judder spring and ring made no difference :crying:

Has anyone here been in a similar position? How did you solve it?

My measurement without any plates is 6.57mm. First I moved the special plate, together with the judder spring, judder ring and metal plate up 1 position in the stack as suggested by the OP and Yoyodyne instructions. That measured out to be around 8.1mm. Then I removed the judder spring and judder ring which unfortunately made no difference, still around 8.1mm. I tried to change the position of the special plate and it's metal plate back to the first position in the stack and even that made no difference. I've had it apart about 4 times now, to make sure that everything was clean and just right, but I always come back to around 1.5mm.

What can I do to get the magical 1.00mm?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Turns out that the solution to my problem is actually pretty simple ...the 675 clutch pack is composed of 2.0mm steel plates and some number of 1.6 mm steel plates (anywhere between 1 to 3 of them).

I simply replaced one of the 2.0mm steel plates with 1.6mm steel plate. That puts me in the 1.0~1.1mm measurement with everything assembled which is spot on.

Note: I actually used a Suzuki steel plate (part number 21451-31E00), which is 1.6mm thick and identical to the Triumph part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I had mine installed by someone and it works great.. does anyone know how to have it slip a little less.. Like have a slight amount of engine break to settle the rear when entering a corner? I feel like if it is all slip and I do all my braking with my front brake the bike won't be as settled as I'd like.. I just want it to work like an OEM slipper such as gsxr, kawi, etc.
You can use the spring retainers to tune the amount of slip.
The Yoyodyne slipper comes with RED and GREY color spring retainers.

Red (taller) = Normal amount of slip
Grey (shorter) = Less slip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
I wanted to add that the 765 Street Triple has a Sigma slipper available and this thread helped me with some hints and facts to help with my install since the engine internals are so similar. However, this thread did not turn up in my Goggle search until the 3rd page of results.

The big difference between the 765 and 675 Sigma kits are that the 675 reuses the OEM clutch pack and the 765 is supplied with a new clutch pack with no judder spring, judder spring washer, and associated friction plate.

I suggest soaking new friction plates and then checking stack height on the bench before installing the slipper as my difference is only .75mm and I have to get a 2.3mm steel plate swapped with a 2.0mm steel prior to finishing installation. Measuring it once it is installed may result in the bike being stuck mid-install while you source a different thickness steel plate.

For sake of clarity, perhaps we could only call them friction plates when they have the soft material and call the plain plates "Steel Plates"? That may help others understand what gets changed. They should always alternate steel and friction in order to best transfer power. If anyone placed steel to steel or friction to friction it would lessen the power which can be transmitted.

Thanks again to the OP (Brettmess)!
 
101 - 105 of 105 Posts
Top