Triumph 675 Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just did a 150km ride with the bike. Everything was normal, had 5 bars during the whole trip. After I hopped off and checked my phone for around 5 minutes, I noticed that the temp went up to max bars (10 I guess?) Shouldn't it cool down or atleast stay in the same range when idling due to the fan kicking in and cooling it? Any advices what could be wrong it or is this normal? Just bought it and this was the first longer trip with it so I have no idea what to expect. Coolant reservoir was on the full line too..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Hot day and engine idling with no air flow around it, the rad fan will barely keep the temp under max. This is normal.

Sent from my SM-N960W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Of course, this is not a car and the cooling system relies heavily on passive airflow through radiator and our tiny fan is too small and weak to keep up. The fan is just there for quick stop and go traffic. So no, you can’t just let it idle indefinitely and expect the fan to cycle and keep temps under control.

That said, I’m not sure it should max out the temp gauge if your cooling system is in good shape. It will get one bar higher than the normal operating temp and should hold there with the fan continuously running. So did the temp gauge fill up to the max or what?

Any info on your bike would help. Is it brand new or does it have a ton of miles on it? In that case when was the last time you had your coolant drained and replaced?
While it was idling did you hear the fan running?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Pockets of air get hotter than coolant. Once cooled down, remove the rad cap and see if you're low.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StanS3

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Of course, this is not a car and the cooling system relies heavily on passive airflow through radiator and our tiny fan is too small and weak to keep up. The fan is just there for quick stop and go traffic. So no, you can’t just let it idle indefinitely and expect the fan to cycle and keep temps under control.

That said, I’m not sure it should max out the temp gauge if your cooling system is in good shape. It will get one bar higher than the normal operating temp and should hold there with the fan continuously running. So did the temp gauge fill up to the max or what?

Any info on your bike would help. Is it brand new or does it have a ton of miles on it? In that case when was the last time you had your coolant drained and replaced?
While it was idling did you hear the fan running?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The bike is fairly old, 2006 daytona 675. Only has 25k kilometres on it. I'm not sure about the coolant though.. Just contacted the previous owner and he hadn't changed it at all within the 2,5 years (6000km) he had it.
I did hear the fan, so I guess that can't be the issue? And shouldn't the bike get hot when riding too if the coolant wasn't working properly? Oh, and when I do around 30km rides with it, the temp stayed within normal when idling. The bars did max out, full 10.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
The bike is fairly old, 2006 daytona 675. Only has 25k kilometres on it. I'm not sure about the coolant though.. Just contacted the previous owner and he hadn't changed it at all within the 2,5 years (6000km) he had it.
I did hear the fan, so I guess that can't be the issue? And shouldn't the bike get hot when riding too if the coolant wasn't working properly? Oh, and when I do around 30km rides with it, the temp stayed within normal when idling. The bars did max out, full 10.
When you ride, the air flow keep the engine from overheating, that is unless you are nearly completely out of coolant or coolant flow is obstructed (bad thermostat or clogged water lines for example).
So if you’re a little low on coolant or have a few air pockets in the system the bike will run normal or near normal temps under normal use but will overheat when the cooling system is overwhelmed. This happens when you ride hard for example on a hot track day or when you leave it idling for a long period of time.

If you’re hitting max bars despite the fan running on an old bike I would check and drain the coolant and check the thermostat as well.

Questions you will need answers to:

- What did the previous owner use as coolant (coolant/antifreeze vs straight water). Straight water is very harmful to radiators and will gunk and clog waterways with scale and rust over time.

- Is your coolant level low? With the bike cold open the radiator cap (forget the expansion tank) and check. It should be full to the brim with fresh coolant as opposed to rusty gunky water. If your coolant is low check for leaks.

- Is your thermostat working properly? There’s a procedure to test it by immersing it in hot water and checking it’s operation.

Don’t leave this hanging. Cooling is one of the most vital systems for an engine. Do it before you blow a head gasket bcs that will make you cry.
I would make a day of it and answer and address all of these questions.

At any rate coolant should be changed every 2-3 years regardless of mileage according the the manual. So I’d say you’re due no matter what.

Use premixed coolant or diluted antifreeze. Always use DISTILLED water in your mixing.

If you have any questions, happy to help


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
When you ride, the air flow keep the engine from overheating, that is unless you are nearly completely out of coolant or coolant flow is obstructed (bad thermostat or clogged water lines for example).
So if you’re a little low on coolant or have a few air pockets in the system the bike will run normal or near normal temps under normal use but will overheat when the cooling system is overwhelmed. This happens when you ride hard for example on a hot track day or when you leave it idling for a long period of time.

If you’re hitting max bars despite the fan running on an old bike I would check and drain the coolant and check the thermostat as well.

Questions you will need answers to:

- What did the previous owner use as coolant (coolant/antifreeze vs straight water). Straight water is very harmful to radiators and will gunk and clog waterways with scale and rust over time.

- Is your coolant level low? With the bike cold open the radiator cap (forget the expansion tank) and check. It should be full to the brim with fresh coolant as opposed to rusty gunky water. If your coolant is low check for leaks.

- Is your thermostat working properly? There’s a procedure to test it by immersing it in hot water and checking it’s operation.

Don’t leave this hanging. Cooling is one of the most vital systems for an engine. Do it before you blow a head gasket bcs that will make you cry.
I would make a day of it and answer and address all of these questions.

At any rate coolant should be changed every 2-3 years regardless of mileage according the the manual. So I’d say you’re due no matter what.

Use premixed coolant or diluted antifreeze. Always use DISTILLED water in your mixing.

If you have any questions, happy to help


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
A stupid question but where is the radiator cap at? Do I need to remove the fairings? Atleast in the reservoir there is red/pink coolant so no water.. It does have like 1cm of brown stuff on the bottom. I will check the radiator after I get off from work.

Edit: When driving in the city, with some traffic stops the bike maxed at 7, so nothing out of ordinary there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
A stupid question but where is the radiator cap at? Do I need to remove the fairings? Atleast in the reservoir there is red/pink coolant so no water.. It does have like 1cm of brown stuff on the bottom. I will check the radiator after I get off from work.

Edit: When driving in the city, with some traffic stops the bike maxed at 7, so nothing out of ordinary there.
You need to remove the side fairings yes. And you drain the coolant by disconnecting one of the hoses on the lower end of the engine.
Lot of how to’s out there. Should be an easy job.
Use a radiator cleaner and reflush and refill with coolant.

Edit:
Make sure you clean out the expansion tank too.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Then gen1 bikes all overheated in traffic. Triumph changed the radiator fan on later models. The new fan comes with a shroud which moves more air through the radiator when stopped in traffic.

The early bikes also had a lot of casting sand (fine white) left over in the coolant passages. I would agree that a thorough flush would be a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Then gen1 bikes all overheated in traffic. Triumph changed the radiator fan on later models. The new fan comes with a shroud which moves more air through the radiator when stopped in traffic.

The early bikes also had a lot of casting sand (fine white) left over in the coolant passages. I would agree that a thorough flush would be a good idea.
Is it possible to order the better fan and install it in mine? Or is it even compatible..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
I did it to mine, but it was not plug and play. Some of the mounts for the shroud are not present on the Gen1 radiator. If you are crafty it can be done though. You just need the shroud.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top