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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes yes, I know what you're all thinking. Not another one of these. And yes, it's another one of these.

Had my first trackday out on the Daytona a few weeks ago and to be honest, everything felt quite civilised so I didn't bother changing anything.

Today I decided to go and check what the settings actually are as I got them off the previous owner. Here's what I found (Stock settings as per the manual in bold)

Forks (clicks from fully in)

Preload - 5 [5] rings (How do you define rings, is it the grooved rings, or the parts between the grooves?)
Rebound - 9 [6] clicks right, 10 clicks left
Compression - 10 [7] clicks right, 9 clicks left

Shock

Rebound - 5 [6] clicks
Compression - 6 [11] clicks

Now, I'm about 144lbs (65kg's) without gear, so I'm quite a lightweight.

How will these different settings affect the bike towards me? I've been reading a lot of guides and such, but I still can't get my head around it completely.

On the forks it looks like the rebound and compression are less than stock, which is fine for a lighter rider, or am I wrong?

On the shock it seems like it's the opposite, especially in terms of compression, or do I have it completely messed up?

Also, does anyone have the measurements for the full extention of the suspension to two defined points for setting up the sag, or will it be different on each bike? The only way to setup shock sag is with one of those c-spanners, correct?

Front sag should be 25-40mm and the rear 25-35mm (ish).

Also, just to confirm. Fully in means turning clockwise right? Lefty loosy, righty tighty?

Cheers!
 

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You're supposed to have the same setting on both tubes of your fork.

And yes, fully in - 2 clicks means fully screwed clockwise then counter clockwise stopping at the second click.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You're supposed to have the same setting on both tubes of your fork.

And yes, fully in - 2 clicks means fully screwed clockwise then counter clockwise stopping at the second click.
Yeah I know both need to be the same, hence noting that they weren't. At least they weren't majorly off. Maybe the previous owner counted them from fully out (going clockwise) and miss counted or something, I dunno.

Thanks for the reply!
 

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I suspect he was on drugs and had trouble counting.

About preload, you're supposed to count the visible grooves.

I found the hard standard settings a good starting point, especially if you know the general guidelines to adjusting to your preferences, but I'm quite heavier than you and prefer precision to comfort.
 

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The rebound damping on the shock of the older Daytona is crap. Press down on the seat and release and you'll notice the back of the bike just snaps up. Now screw it all the way in and you'll notice appropriately that when you do that it returns slowly. Now unscrew two clips and check it will snap up again. Go back in one click so you are one click out from full in and leave it there. It will be a tad slow there but it's the best you'll get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I suspect he was on drugs and had trouble counting.

About preload, you're supposed to count the visible grooves.

I found the hard standard settings a good starting point, especially if you know the general guidelines to adjusting to your preferences, but I'm quite heavier than you and prefer precision to comfort.
Haha!

Yeah, I thought the grooves would be the yardstick!

I found another topic on here from someone who had his suspension looked at and weighs just a little bit more than I do and these are the settings:

Forks (From fully in)
Preload: 6 rings vs 5 stock
Rebound: 6 clicks vs 6 stock
Compression : 7 clicks vs 7 stock

Shock (From fully in)
Rebound: 3 clicks vs 6 stock
Compression: 5 clicks vs 11 stock

The rebound damping on the shock of the older Daytona is crap. Press down on the seat and release and you'll notice the back of the bike just snaps up. Now screw it all the way in and you'll notice appropriately that when you do that it returns slowly. Now unscrew two clips and check it will snap up again. Go back in one click so you are one click out from full in and leave it there. It will be a tad slow there but it's the best you'll get.
I will give that a shot. So basically one click from fully clockwise?
 

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+1 on the shock rebound, but I suspect it's not helped by the hard spring either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
+1 on the shock rebound, but I suspect it's not helped by the hard spring either.
Yeah, a new spring is definitely on the cards. I somehow think I read on here somewhere that one of the ZX6 year model's rear springs will work, does anyone know anything about that? I tried searching but couldn't find anything.

Also, with all the word going around that Racetech's spring calculator might not be that great, where would I find out what spring I should fit in the rear?

Yes one click out from full clockwise on rebound on the shock.
Cool, I will give it a shot! Thanks!
 

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I weigh the same as you, what settings did you end up with?

My buell has very specific settings by weight in the owners manual. The daytona just has standard soft and hard...i mean really?? lol

Can someone please help me out, 145lbs and not a kneedragger.

Also, a quick rundown on how to adjust each, front and rear, preload/rebound/compression would be greatly appreciated as the manual is kinda vague.

thank you :D
 

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just want to make sure i understand you...the groove is the low part of the tread, not the ridge correct right?
I'm talking about the fork's preload ;)

I don't know what the setting for the shock preload is, as you're not supposed to fiddle with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
just want to make sure i understand you...the groove is the low part of the tread, not the ridge correct right?


The "engraved" lines if that explains it better. Above is with all the pre-load out, 8 lines showing.

I'm talking about the fork's preload ;)

I don't know what the setting for the shock preload is, as you're not supposed to fiddle with it.
Shock pre-load is done with a c-spanner and you'll have to set it up by determining sag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thanks wik1d, pics helped alot!!

tripped - so ur saying im too skinny and just to back out the preload on the front shocks all the way til they stop?
No problem!

Thing is, the Daytonas are sprung for much heavier riders. You might be able to get the sag set up, but ideally you'd wanna at least change the springs in the forks and shock.
 

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Shock pre-load is done with a c-spanner and you'll have to set it up by determining sag.
Indeed, but the manual states it should not be adjusted OR YOU WILL DIE :rofl2: So they don't give any tips on standard setup.
 

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Howdy m8, I've banged out about 20 trackdays on my 675 over the last 4 years and found Dave Moss guides on suspension set-up to be invaluable. I eventually had my bike professionally set-up and to be honest it was not too far off the mark.

This vid is superb for setting Sag, Rebound and Compression. And for actually understanding what you are doing.

http://www.onthethrottle.com/howto/suspension-set-up-on-a-suzuki-gsx-r600/

Dave Moss actually raced a 675 for a few years and posted this guide on the 675's suspension (I copied it years ago, cant remember the original source soz);

FORKS:
Normally the end of travel will be at the joint of the chrome tube and the axle casting. The actual bottom on these forks is 17mm above the casting so if you are using a zip tie to measure travel, use a Sharpie to mark the chrome tube. This measurement can be changed to 5mm if you send the forks to a suspension professional, but this modification would only be recommended for track or race use.

Spring:
The stock springs are .95kg and that works best with a rider that is 170-200Ibs. Therefore you may need to adjust both gold spring preload adjusters to match your weight, using the machined grooves to match each side correctly. Clockwise increases spring tension to stiffen the spring and counter clockwise softens the spring. Street sag is best around 40mm, track sag at around 35mm.

Rebound:
This screw is located in the center of the gold preload adjuster on each leg and both must be set the same. Turn the rebound screw all the way to the right until it stops and then count 4 clicks counter clockwise. Use this for street riding. If you are riding at the track, set the rebound at 2 clicks out.

Compression:
This screw is located at the bottom of the forks on either side. Turn the screw clockwise until it stops and then turn counterclockwise to set at 10 clicks out. For the track you will need 6 clicks out.

SHOCK:
You cannot remove the rear ride height spacer located between the shock mount and the frame. The shock mount will not fit flat to the frame. The only way to alter the geometry of the bike (without machining new swing arm pivot inserts) is to change the fork position in the triple clamps by raising or lowering them.

Spring:
The shock spring is progressive meaning that the more the shock travels, the greater the spring resists. Normally a sag measurement of 35-40mm would be set for the street and 30mm for the track. As this is a progressive spring, you need far larger sag numbers than normal to be able to access 90% of the shock's total travel. The spring starts out at almost 700lbs by 1 inch of travel, and the 675 race bike has a 600lb straight rate spring (I am 220lbs in gear). For those under 1501bs, set the spring with 3 threads showing above the lock rings and those 150-2001bs need 4 threads showing. If you are over 220lbs then 5 threads
showing would be a good start. '

Rebound:
Depending on the tension set on the shock spring, you will need to go from 5 clicks out to 2 clicks out. Never go to zero or one click out as the damping is too aggressive

Compression:
Located at the top of the shock, this screw affects high speed compression only as it is attached to a spring and plate internally. Set the screw to 10 clicks out for the street and track.


Just for your information my settings are as follows (I'm 185lb in gear, bike is 4 year old, really need to get the forks and shock serviced this year).

Front Sag 35mm with 6 lines showing.
Rear Sag is 30mm with approx 8-9 threads showing

Front Rebound 5-6 clicks out for the road, 3-4 clicks out for the track.
Front Compression 9 clicks out for the road, 6 clicks out for the track.

Rear Rebound 5-6 clicks out for the road, 3-4 clicks out for the track.
Rear Compression 10 clicks out for both.

My rebound settings vary depending on ambient temperature (Scotland = nighmare), but if you watch the above video it should become clear on how to test and set your rebound.

You can hear a lot of bad things about the stock suspension on the 675. I looked into changing the internals on my forks and changing the rear shock and the cost was substantial. Ultimately though on track it feels superb and can still lap faster than most 1000cc bikes. Maybe changing the rear spring in your case would be a good idea and doesn't cost the earth.

Also you should check out the 'Two Clicks Out' series of vids on You Tube, real examples of basic suspension setup.

[nomedia="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dfK3hKuyP0"]YouTube - Two Clicks Out 12: Shredding A Rear Tire[/nomedia]

Hope the above helps m8, not the gospel just my general advice.
 
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