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Interesting thread fellows. 2 cents if I may, just to add to Mr. B's reasoning as to why so many of our bikes here in the states end up in the salvage yards so soon, I would mention our ins. companies' frequent readiness to write a bike off rather than pay f/ repairs. Also, I suspect that many of us in the more northern states who attempt year round riding encounter more mishaps due to dealing w/ somewhat more severe weather issues as our winters are overall perhaps a tad more extreme than those of most of Oz. Just my guess though about the comparative winter weather as I have never had the pleasure of visiting Ozzieland, so I may very well be wrong in that assumption. Feel free to educate me upon that point. I do know that I rode in temps down to 6 F last year and would have done below zed if a "probably" ice free day had arisen.

Best to all,
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Just my guess though about the comparative winter weather as I have never had the pleasure of visiting Ozzieland, so I may very well be wrong in that assumption. Feel free to educate me upon that point. I do know that I rode in temps down to 6 F last year and would have done below zed if a "probably" ice free day had arisen.
Australia has 6 states, of which only two are smaller than Texas, which is important when factoring in climate variations across the various states. Where I live, Victoria, which is in the southern-most mainland state in Australia, the weather is comparible to northern California. New South Wales has weather comparible to southern California. Queensland is like Florida/Mexico. South Australia is like Arizona. Western Australia can't be categorised so easily because it's roughly one third the size of mainland USA and spans about 2500kms from north to south, and 1500kms from east to west, but it'd be a bit like Ecuador in the far north, to SoCal in the far south. Tasmania, the island state to the south of mainland Australia, is comparible to Oregon.

Yes, our winters are very mild in comparison to much of mainland USA. Pretty much no major city in Australia experiences snow except on very rare occasion in Canberra.
 

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TDR250 was 50hp at the crank, and 137kgs dry. Possibly a better solution than that would be street-fightering an RGV250.

Speaking of which, I think I'm firming up on what I want to do, and that really is just to street-fighter a Daytona 675. I kept thinking about stripping back a Street Triple R, but for the small price difference (StripleR costs $1400 less than the D675 here in Aus new), I'd be better off buying a rashed low-kms second hand D675 and converting that.

Thanks for all the input and feedback guys.
Hi FLUX, for what you want to do, of course you are right.

A gently binned Daytona is going to cost much less than a new Street Triple R, and you want to throw away all the bits that are likely to be broken or scratched anyway.

Good luck to you, and come back and show and tell, when your finished.

BTW, the TDM's engine can be easily stretched to about 470 cc, which you can't do (easily) with the RGV's motor.

regards,CrazyCam

P.S. Yup...it's big. Laying up bikes for winter......nah! Some days in summer are too hot to ride, but not many.
 

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On the other hand in the UK bikes are 'kin expensive compared to Oz, the UK itself is quite small and the riding season is quite short. If you do risk riding all year round you have to contend with 40 weeks of the year rain & salt spread on the roads in winter so your new bike rots to death before you wear it out. So the poms put their shiny new bikes away to hibernate & mileages are thus low.
I dont know how anyone clocks up these outrageous mileages when there are only about ten sunny Sundays in our calendar :smile:
Flux said:
I want a superlight, grunty, nimble machine that allows that sort of lifespan and usage. I am not really interested in your criticisms of my expectations. That's just negative crap that serves no purpose.
Didn't think I had ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Didn't think I had ?
I'm just a grumpy prick at times. You started telling me about how you didn't understand my point, then (effectively) dismissed it as fantasy on the basis that no bikes, other than BMW's, could last long enough to put that many miles on them.

I see you're from England though. Now I understand. Going on a 750km long (~470 miles) day trip on Sunday with dry and sunny forecast of 23C, and +/5C of that represents well over half of the Sunday's here in Victoria, Australia. Average distance between townships will be around 30 miles, with most of the roads we're on looking largely like this.

About now it'll probably come as no surprise to you that almost half the people I ride with emigrated here from England. :nod:
 

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I'm just a grumpy prick at times. You started telling me about how you didn't understand my point, then (effectively) dismissed it as fantasy on the basis that no bikes, other than BMW's, could last long enough to put that many miles on them.

I see you're from England though. Now I understand. Going on a 750km long (~470 miles) day trip on Sunday with dry and sunny forecast of 23C, and +/5C of that represents well over half of the Sunday's here in Victoria, Australia. Average distance between townships will be around 30 miles, with most of the roads we're on looking largely like this.

About now it'll probably come as no surprise to you that almost half the people I ride with emigrated here from England. :nod:
Ah, just the way I wrote it. It reads completely different to me, but then I wrote it :nod:

It was really trying to understand why you suddenly added the high mileage into the equation when it had not been mentioned in your previous post (it was almost like you were adding the requirements after every suggested solution, but it made sense in the next post).

Far from BMW being the only bike to complete high mileages, it was just a comment on the bikes we see in the UK, most everything but BMWs dissolve in a pile of rust and wiring faults unless they are kept off the roads in winter or babied like a newborn. Most bike engines are capable of massive mileages without much effort.

By the way C50/70/90 regularly rack up enormous mileages and they are tiny single cylinder engines, mostly thrashed within an inch of their lives and regularly left without maintenance. So I think singles can manage just as well as multis.

Sunny roads.......thats a Adobe Photoshop fantasy :grin:
 

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FLUX-really enjoyed the ride vid-wish I could take a crack at that tar-the strangest sensation of course is watching the ride from the "other" side of the road. How long a run is that and how far to you travel to get there? Upstate NY has some excellent roads but I travel 150 miles before being in an area with reduced traffic. I was amazed at how "few" autos were travelling in the other direction for the #of miles you travelled. Have to say I wish that road was in my backyard.
 

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FLUX, Marvelous! Thanks f/ the lesson! :notworthy:

And beautiful strip of road. But 'ell's Bells, mate...git on the right side o' the road, ye daft git, a'fore ye git yer'sel kill'd! :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
How long a run is that and how far to you travel to get there?
That particular stretch is about 120kms (~75 miles) from where I live, of which at least half that distance means covering roads of a similar nature with minimal traffic. Only about the first 20 miles is spent getting out of the city conurbia, after which the population thins out considerably.

The stretch in that video is about 12.5 miles long. The road that the video stops at, at that right turn there, goes on for another 12 miles into which 190 corners are packed, which is even more deserted, and about half of which are switchbacks. It's THAT stretch of road where a super-light-weight grunty bike with longer travel suspension kicks butt. Average mid-corner speed there is around 40mph. After that is another 10 miles of somewhat bumpy swervery before you get to the next township.

Turn back from the start, and there's a small township, another 10 miles of sweepers, and then you get to another excellent 11 mile long road that looks like this, of which said video is about one third of it.

If you said I could travel 150 miles to find some roads, I'm not kidding at all when I say that around here you could take your pick of at least 40 different roads similar to the first one, many of which are twice, thrice, or even four times as long, and even less trafficked.

Throw in ride-all-year weather, and that's why I put so much mileage on my bikes.
 

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That particular stretch is about 120kms (~75 miles) from where I live, of which at least half that distance means covering roads of a similar nature with minimal traffic. Only about the first 20 miles is spent getting out of the city conurbia, after which the population thins out considerably.

The stretch in that video is about 12.5 miles long. The road that the video stops at, at that right turn there, goes on for another 12 miles into which 190 corners are packed, which is even more deserted, and about half of which are switchbacks. It's THAT stretch of road where a super-light-weight grunty bike with longer travel suspension kicks butt. Average mid-corner speed there is around 40mph. After that is another 10 miles of somewhat bumpy swervery before you get to the next township.

Turn back from the start, and there's a small township, another 10 miles of sweepers, and then you get to another excellent 11 mile long road that looks like this, of which said video is about one third of it.

If you said I could travel 150 miles to find some roads, I'm not kidding at all when I say that around here you could take your pick of at least 40 different roads similar to the first one, many of which are twice, thrice, or even four times as long, and even less trafficked.

Throw in ride-all-year weather, and that's why I put so much mileage on my bikes.
man i am jealous, the closest decent stretch is about 80km away, but getting there is all highway...or crappy back roads.
 

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FLUX-you are a lucky fellow-I think I need to relocate. Can I also assume the LEO presence is as light as the traffic? Those are truly some great roads-and I just thought you guys spent your time avoiding crocs, cobras and kangaroos.:cool2:
 

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That particular stretch is about 120kms (~75 miles) from where I live, of which at least half that distance means covering roads of a similar nature with minimal traffic. Only about the first 20 miles is spent getting out of the city conurbia, after which the population thins out considerably.

The stretch in that video is about 12.5 miles long. The road that the video stops at, at that right turn there, goes on for another 12 miles into which 190 corners are packed, which is even more deserted, and about half of which are switchbacks. It's THAT stretch of road where a super-light-weight grunty bike with longer travel suspension kicks butt. Average mid-corner speed there is around 40mph. After that is another 10 miles of somewhat bumpy swervery before you get to the next township.

Turn back from the start, and there's a small township, another 10 miles of sweepers, and then you get to another excellent 11 mile long road that looks like this, of which said video is about one third of it.

If you said I could travel 150 miles to find some roads, I'm not kidding at all when I say that around here you could take your pick of at least 40 different roads similar to the first one, many of which are twice, thrice, or even four times as long, and even less trafficked.

Throw in ride-all-year weather, and that's why I put so much mileage on my bikes.
After finally being able to view the video (wmp 11 installed now). I see where you are going with the lightweight long travel idea. I went that way for the same reason with the KTM 950SM........get one, it will do exactly what you want, no need to muck about with alternatives. It will do the distance you need and the speeds in comfort and it does those lumpy, bumpy back roads beautifully (made me feel the road was twice as wide compared with other bikes).

The only reason I got rid of mine is that the miles I was doing meant i had to keep re-learning the riding style which made it difficult to use properly. You are obviously doing the distances and are seem pretty smooth. You will bloody love it. :thumbsup:
 

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FLUX, thanks f/ another great vid. Wish I was at that skill level and I love the low traffic, tree lined twisties. :thumbsup:

2 ?'s:

1. does the solid center paint mean No Passing in Oz?
2. what is the name of the band in the 2nd link?

Subtle hint to our Mod - Hey, wouldn't it be great it we had a sticky just f/ ride vids. And it would be especially awesome if only a 1-5 rating system were available to the viewers, but no actual comments were possible so as to minimize the clutter. It would be a sticky dedicated just to rides and any other stuff that got posted there would be either deleted or relocated by the Mod. I don't know if a sticky like that is possible, but I think it would be the bee's knees, the bat's ass, or whatever...and I suppose you would have to limit each post to something like 7-8 minutes. It would also need a HOT button that viewers could use to alert our Mods to something inappropriate that might be hidden somewhere in the middle of a ride vid. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
2 ?'s:

1. does the solid center paint mean No Passing in Oz?
2. what is the name of the band in the 2nd link?
1) It depends on which state you're in. In most states of Australia, it's treated the same as double solid white lines (no overtaking). In the state of Victoria, it's treated the same as single dashed white lines (overtaking allowed when safe), and is used on tight roads to clearly delineate lanes when dashed white lines might fail to do so adequately.

2) Collective Soul
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Well, it's all solved now. Just picked up a repairable write-off '07 675 that has just 760kms on the clock (~470 miles).

This will form the basis for my project streetfighter. Pick the bike up tomorrow. First step is to clear the rep. write-off status it has and re-register it for the road, and then I can start modifying proper.

Looking forwards to it. Already started researching what I'll need to get it into basic road-going trim, and then it'll be an incremental process from there.
 

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g'day Flux , did you get the black one from motorcycle disposals. sorry haven't read all posts in this thread as yet. If so and if its not a rude question what did they let it go for. i was keeping an eye on the site then it just dissapeared.

cheers tim
 
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