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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Friends!

I have a stock Street Triple R (STR) rear shock. My understanding is that this STR shock is the same as the 06-08 Daytona shock but with a slightly softer spring (and colors). In any case, the spring rate is still significantly stiffer than ideal for me.

Would it make any sense to swap the blue STR spring that I currently have on my bike with a silver Street Triple (ST) spring? Or is the stock ST spring going to be too soft when installed in a STR shock? (I'm 5'9" 170 lbs without gear).

What do you guys think? Is the spring rate of the stock ST shock the same as the one that would be recommended by racetech? (not sure if I should input ST or STR as my bike) Has anyone with a Daytona or STR fitted a ST spring on their shocks?

Feel free to fully assume that I know absolutely nothing about suspension, because the fact is, I know absolutely nothing about suspension.

Gracias ~~
 

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Street riding right? With your weight you should be on a 7.75 kg/mm rear spring. Pretty sure either Street model's spring will be too stiff, I'd just get a spring from Race Tech for ~$100 that'll be perfect for your weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Street riding right? With your weight you should be on a 7.75 kg/mm rear spring. Pretty sure either Street model's spring will be too stiff, I'd just get a spring from Race Tech for ~$100 that'll be perfect for your weight.
Yes, primarily street riding. I was hoping to just swap out my spring with something that I already have just sitting in the garage...

Okay, now I'm confused. According to the Race Tech Spring Rate Calculator, I receive the following recommendations based off of the following parameters: Type of Riding Street, Rider Weight 170 lbs, Bike Weight 390 lbs

09-10 Triumph Street Triple R
REAR SHOCK SPRING
Recommended Rear Shock Spring Rate for Street: 7.75 kg/mm (use closest available)
Stock Shock Spring Rate: 12.6 kg/mm (stock)

09 Triumph Street Triple 675
REAR SHOCK SPRING
Recommended Rear Shock Spring Rate for Street: 10.95 kg/mm (use closest available)
Stock Shock Spring Rate: 11.28 kg/mm (stock)

Which one should I be choosing? ST or STR? Why would the recommendations be different? Again, I have an 09 standard Street Triple with a STR rear shock installed. It looks like the stock ST rear spring is pretty close to what I should be using anyway, so would swapping it out into a STR/Daytona rear shock give me some adjustability to what should be a pretty good spring for my weight?
 

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You should be looking at STR because that's the shock you have. They change recommended spring rates between the two because they're different shocks with different damping characteristics. You can try the stock ST spring; it'll be better than what you have and probably cost you $10-20 if you bring the shock to a shop off the bike, but a softer spring would be ideal.

The reason you need a softer spring is so you can correctly set preload. With one as stiff as you've got, you probably can't dial in enough preload so it's not compressing as much as it should over bumps. If you can dial in the correct preload with the stock ST spring, you'll save $90, but I doubt you'll be able to. If you're at all mechanically inclined, give it a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You should be looking at STR because that's the shock you have. They change recommended spring rates between the two because they're different shocks with different damping characteristics. You can try the stock ST spring; it'll be better than what you have and probably cost you $10-20 if you bring the shock to a shop off the bike, but a softer spring would be ideal.

The reason you need a softer spring is so you can correctly set preload. With one as stiff as you've got, you probably can't dial in enough preload so it's not compressing as much as it should over bumps. If you can dial in the correct preload with the stock ST spring, you'll save $90, but I doubt you'll be able to. If you're at all mechanically inclined, give it a shot.
Thank you sir. I am not entirely sure what all of that means (yet), but trust me, I'm learning. Looks like I'm shopping for a new spring... :whistle:
 

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Thank you sir. I am not entirely sure what all of that means (yet), but trust me, I'm learning. Looks like I'm shopping for a new spring... :whistle:
Do you know how to adjust your spring? It's worth seeing what kind of preload you can get now. Quick how-to:
Spring adjuster collar is just above the spring. You need a special tool to do it, but it's cheap. You can even stick a screwdriver in one of the notches and gently tap with a mallet to turn it. Turn the collar counter-clockwise all the way to the top of the threads. Put the bike on a rear stand, have a friend lift the rear of the bike so the shock is fully extended, careful not to lift off the stand. Measure in millimeters from the rear axle to another hard point on the tail, like pass footpeg bracket or nick in the paint. That's value A. Sit on the bike in normal riding position, have your friend quickly press on the tail, give it a second and do the same measurement. That's value B. Stay seated, have your friend quickly lift the tail, give it a second, and do the same measurement. That's value C.
Preload aka sag = A - (average of B & C), should be 30 to 35mm for street riding. If within a couple mm of 30, go for the stock ST spring. If you're at around 25 or less, buy a new one.
 

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Im no expert so i took my bike to a highly recommended suspension shop here in brisbane OZ this is his conclusion

My str spring is a 12.2 OEM measured at suspension shop its ok ish for 90kgs rider
30mm sag with 9 threads showing about 5 mm static sag he said next spring weight down would be ok for me to but not required he said he uses sag as his spring calculator not what race tec says
Dampening was the problem

I know this is conflicting info but...

he modified the shim stack in mine $205
the comp adjuster is a set point to use the high speed part of the circuit which is way to stiff to begin with and under done on low speed he modified the stack to suit
Ohlins would supply a 12kg spring on there shock for my weight and bike .Of course Ohlins would be a better shock they use 46mm valve the KYB has a 40mm in it a limiting factor
People always blame spring for high speed dampening jolts???

confused ill bet
This is how it was explained to me and does make sense and my ride quality has improved over the goat tracks in OZ
Hope this helps
Horra
 

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Nelson, how did your rear spring delimah turn out? Sorry to bring a thread back from the dead (but at least I used the search function, eh?), but after Orangeman or Macbandit said that swaping a Daytona rear shock and spring would result in an unbalanced suspention, I've been looking for a way to balance it, since I just got one off a 2010 D675.

I want the adjustability because the rear end of my Streety feels too bouncy and has a kind of "floaty" feel in corners. I only weigh a buck forty, so I don't need a stiffer spring (quite the opposite I'd suppose), I'd just like to be able to increase the damping and slow the rebound a tad. Eventually I'll upgrade my front forks as well, but in the meantime I figured that swapping the spring on the D975 rear assembly for my stock spring would help it stay closer to being balanced. Would that work? Is that a valid hypothesis? Or am I meddeling with powers I can't possibly comprehend?

I haven't made any changes to the suspention yet, not even preload (and no, I haven't checked my sag yet), so I thought I'd ask before I do something I might regret. Any help from knowledgeable folks is appreciated.
 

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The general consensus is that the stock rear spring is too stiff for a lot of riders except heavyweights, and the front fork is too lightly sprung.

Also, the stock street triple has no damping on the front or rear.

Buying a lighter spring for the rear is only going to help a little.

What is needed is a decent damping system as well as the correct spring for your weight to get the sag and set up you desire.

I took the cheap route with a Honda CBR 600rr rear shock, and a stiffer spring in the fork with lighter weight oil.

Other options are aftermarket shocks like Penske or Nitron, etc and different valving/springs/oil in the front fork.

Whichever way you decide to go, it's going to cost you money...

Anything with wheels or heels always does...:nod:


S.
 

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I thought you would add thicker oil to stiffen the front end up?

I am 221lbs and have the opposite problem of everyone. The rear end feels great, but the fronts to soft.
 

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Thicker oil increases damping, thinner oil reduces it. The thing to remember is that you can't really compare old oil of an unknown source with anything else, and you can't change brands without similar issues. pick a good brand and stick to it.

You need to get your springs and preload right before trying to change the damping.... Don't listen to those who say it's not adjustable, it's just not adjustable EXTERNALLY
 

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Not to bump and old post, but for correction I'm in the same boat. I spoke with Race Tech and they recommended staying with the spring rate built for the bike NOT for a particular damper. I weigh about 165-170lbs, so they recommended a 600lbs spring. I installed the spring and rode the ST'09 around for a while and it made a huge difference with road compliance. My suspension is all stock but with a STR rear damper.
 

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Yes, primarily street riding. I was hoping to just swap out my spring with something that I already have just sitting in the garage...

Okay, now I'm confused. According to the Race Tech Spring Rate Calculator, I receive the following recommendations based off of the following parameters: Type of Riding Street, Rider Weight 170 lbs, Bike Weight 390 lbs

09-10 Triumph Street Triple R
REAR SHOCK SPRING
Recommended Rear Shock Spring Rate for Street: 7.75 kg/mm (use closest available)
Stock Shock Spring Rate: 12.6 kg/mm (stock)

09 Triumph Street Triple 675
REAR SHOCK SPRING
Recommended Rear Shock Spring Rate for Street: 10.95 kg/mm (use closest available)
Stock Shock Spring Rate: 11.28 kg/mm (stock)

Which one should I be choosing? ST or STR? Why would the recommendations be different? Again, I have an 09 standard Street Triple with a STR rear shock installed. It looks like the stock ST rear spring is pretty close to what I should be using anyway, so would swapping it out into a STR/Daytona rear shock give me some adjustability to what should be a pretty good spring for my weight?
Shh. Don't tell anyone, but Race Tech's database is wrong.

The stock ST spring is 8.6 kg/mm and the STR spring is 11.3 kg/mm.
 

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STR 2010 Spring

I weigh 157 lbs without gear. Race Tech recommends putting a 11.6 kg/mm spring while the stock is at 12.2 kg/mm.
Is it worth the upgrade ?
As an alternative would backing off preload help?

Where are my Suspension gurus????
 

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Hey I would Check out this video from David Moss. He goes through suspension tuning at a fairly good level. It is much more difficult in then the video would let on.

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