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Hey, newb here...I completed the MSF course and just picked up a 2009 Ninja 205R with 2,200 miles on it for this summer. I am already thinking about what bike I will upgrade to but I will not put the 250R up for sale at the earliest before this Fall or next Spring. As of right now, I'm thinking my next bike will be either a Daytona 675 or CBR600RR.

I wanted to ask for some feedback on what you guys think are the most important things to master on the 250R before I upgrade. What should I practice the most this summer on the 250? Is it as simple as braking, turning, throttle control, etc?

Just finished reading the Street Smarts- post your tips - Triumph675.Net Forums post and I have Proficient Motorcycling on the way too so I guess that will help answer my question. If you want to convince me to get the 675 over the CBR next year, you can do so also :laugh:
 

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Its kinda hard to say which is most important because they are all important and tied together.

I would say the most important skills to master in my book are throttle control, brake control, proper form. Situational awareness is another.

In all honesty, the only way you get proficient is just seat time. Read the books and apply. Wear the gear because you don't want to hinder your learning because of injury from an off.

I would pick up the book Twist of the Wrist Vol. 2. It goes over Survival Reactions and those are things that will kill you
 

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Ninja250 is a great bike - don't be too quick to get rid of it. I agree with the above post, just get as much seat time as possible, and don't feel pressured to improve - it will come. Get the best gear you can possibly afford as well, just in case. :nod:
As for CBR vs Daytona, both are excellent machines. When you feel you are ready to purchase one, try to ride each one first. Triumph dealers usually have a day or two during the year where you get to sample the bikes via factory-sponsored tours. Enjoy your Ninja!
 

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Agree with what has already been said.
A good way to practice your slow riding and throttle control is grab a heap of empty coke cans and head to an empty parking lot. Make a figure 8 course, slalom course, and do some U-Turns. These skills require smooth throttle and braking control without either its hard to do any of the exercises smoothly.

At the same time practice emergency braking... Make a braking point and pace out how far its taking you to stop. Slowly improve your braking and get to know how long/far it actually take to stop your bike at various speeds...

Just remember to take things slowly...

Just my 2cents
 

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HAZARD AWARENESS. This is the one you should spend the most concious effort on and practice your forward planning. Bike control will come naturally with saddle time as others have said but hazard awareness is something lacking in even seasoned riders that haven't practiced it. It will save your life one day I garrenty (spelling?).
 

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Save the money you're going to spend on the 675 for the track. Met a guy on a ninja 250 last weekend and this guy can kick some serious ass. He overtake on most beginner riders on 600/750 even 1000 in corners like it was a piece of cake. That's the only guy I've met so far who I can safely say has over grown his bike.
 

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the best thign your 250 is going to teach you, aside from the basics of braking, throttle, turning, etc, is how to preserve momentum.

As you ride more and get more comfortable with the basic mechanics, you'll find that the 250 will force you to keep your corner entry speeds high if you want to keep your speeds up, because there isn't 120 bhp to rocket you into triple digits again. Bear in mind this is stuff that you should be working out at the track.

The main problem with guys starting on 600's or bigger when it comes to being "fast", is that they never learn this. (I didn't learn this, and I hate that I didn't) Instead, they use the overwhelming power of the bike to make up for sloppy riding. but, if you can learn to keep entry speeds high on a 250, it'll definitely cross over to any bike that you ride.
 

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If you want to convince me to get the 675 over the CBR next year, you can do so also
Don't think I can really add much to what has already been posted. But, I will say that, coming from a CBR, I have no doubt in my mind that the daytona is a far superior bike. It is more fun to ride, easier to control, and just flat out sexier. :nod:
 

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the best thign your 250 is going to teach you, aside from the basics of braking, throttle, turning, etc, is how to preserve momentum.

As you ride more and get more comfortable with the basic mechanics, you'll find that the 250 will force you to keep your corner entry speeds high if you want to keep your speeds up, because there isn't 120 bhp to rocket you into triple digits again. Bear in mind this is stuff that you should be working out at the track.

The main problem with guys starting on 600's or bigger when it comes to being "fast", is that they never learn this. (I didn't learn this, and I hate that I didn't) Instead, they use the overwhelming power of the bike to make up for sloppy riding. but, if you can learn to keep entry speeds high on a 250, it'll definitely cross over to any bike that you ride.
+1, like I was saying do some track day and establish good ground work for your riding skill on your 250 before letting it go. I also miss out on getting the basic down with a smaller displacement bike.
 

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JSMAKR - I was in your situation not long ago, was riding a Hyosung GT250R then upgraded. I was looking at the same two bikes, and rode the CBR600rr and triumphback to back one day. My advice - BUY THE TRIUMPH!!!:thumbup: I found the Honda was very easy to just jump on and ride and required very little effort to feel comfortable on and get it to do what you wanted. But the Trumpy just had that much more soul! I'm a big guy (6'5" and 105kg) so I found that the extra torque and low-down power made a massive difference, and really if its gonna be used on the road mainly then thats what you're after.

As far as points to learn, I found it very helpful to find someone who had years of exerience and knew what they were doing (luckily my old man..)and just go riding with them. Follow their lines through corners, learn how your bike brakes (most important feature) and be as smooth as possible.

Don't go straight for a corner, balls to the wall before you KNOW you can make it out the other end with the bike still shiny side up and your butt on the seat. (I've been guilty of being over-confident. Usually requires a change of underwear...:laugh:)

Most importantly be aware! People don't see you! The day I completed my "advanced rider safe course" (compulsory to get your licence here) I had a car pull out in front of me. He stopped at a T-section, looked straight at me, then pulled out. Never presume people see you - they look straight at you but don't click that you're actually another road user!

And have fun!:scooter:
 

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+1! And SPACE...leave yourself plenty of it! Also stay clear of big rigs. They often "side-skip" over bumps and have loads of turbulance around them. If you come up on one, PASS it. You don't want to be next to it, or behind it (the air turbulance behind them is NASTY and will distract/fatigue you as well as block all your vision of what's ahead).
 

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Most importantly be aware! People don't see you! The day I completed my "advanced rider safe course" (compulsory to get your licence here) I had a car pull out in front of me. He stopped at a T-section, looked straight at me, then pulled out. Never presume people see you - they look straight at you but don't click that you're actually another road user!

And have fun!:scooter:
Funny thing, on my way to my safety course I had a guy in a Honda Accord pull a left turn straight across my lane in front of me, and slam on his breaks trying not to scuff his precious lowered bumper kit on the parking lot on-ramp thingy. I did a stoppie from 55mph, and promptly did a single finger salute as I weaved within 6 inches of his back bumper. And changed my underoos when I got to the training course.

Very valuable stuff in the rider training course. Guy that was leading managed to pull off the figure eight in a box thingy on a busa which impressed everyone there. The last part of the course is to do a short stop from 15-20mph in second gear, and end up stopped in first. It was almost painful to be going that slow in second on a bike that can go 60 in first.
 

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Hey, I am a step behind the OP (not getting a ninja for a while, then planning on stepping up to 675 afterward.)

sorry to thread jack but is the capability of the 250r something that takes a while to learn? For example, keeping up with and passing bigger bikes using turning "management?" or is it pretty naturally since its an easier bike?

Also I know MSF has bikes for you to learn on but can you bring your own as well?

/thread jack.
 

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the best thign your 250 is going to teach you, aside from the basics of braking, throttle, turning, etc, is how to preserve momentum.

As you ride more and get more comfortable with the basic mechanics, you'll find that the 250 will force you to keep your corner entry speeds high if you want to keep your speeds up, because there isn't 120 bhp to rocket you into triple digits again. Bear in mind this is stuff that you should be working out at the track.

The main problem with guys starting on 600's or bigger when it comes to being "fast", is that they never learn this. (I didn't learn this, and I hate that I didn't) Instead, they use the overwhelming power of the bike to make up for sloppy riding. but, if you can learn to keep entry speeds high on a 250, it'll definitely cross over to any bike that you ride.
WORD!!! This is what I am just tapping into now. The 675 was and is my first bike...and I'm just getting into this now after 10+ track days. I'm carrying much more corner speed that it even has thrown off what gear I'm supposed to be in. Now I have to be a gear up, but make sure I'm at a proper RPM to do so. My last track day I was happy and somewhat frustrated because my gear and shifting rhythm was thrown off...but I was going faster. So now back to the drawing board (or track maps)

I love this sport and simultaneously it frustrates me. Just when you thought you had it figured out, you find something that makes you go faster and now you have to readjust. And as you get faster, it gets more expensive. My evolution to motorcycling right now is something I never thought I would expect. I always thought I would just be a canyon rider...now I'm a track day whore and do canyons as secondary. I thought I would be happy if I were at a certain pace. Now I want to find ways to get faster.

Now it makes me wish I did start on a 250 or SV650 so I picked up these skills a lot earlier.

So OP, don't be in a rush to learn...and if you have the space and money, SAVE the bike instead of selling to get another. Sometimes you can learn a few new tricks on a slower machine. I know I learned a lot of things when I did a 50cc track day...but that's another story.
 

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Hey, I am a step behind the OP (not getting a ninja for a while, then planning on stepping up to 675 afterward.)

sorry to thread jack but is the capability of the 250r something that takes a while to learn? For example, keeping up with and passing bigger bikes using turning "management?" or is it pretty naturally since its an easier bike?

Also I know MSF has bikes for you to learn on but can you bring your own as well?

/thread jack.
To answer your question,...I just posted about this...but I digress...

The capability of a less powerful bike actually makes it easier to learn how to do turning management. It takes away most of the fear associated with bigger bikes. The gyroscopic effect is not as drastic as a 600 or 1000 so turning it will be a lot easier. And its more forgiving if you screw up. I learned that doing a 50cc track day...and it took about 7 track days for the skill to truly "click" on my 675.
 
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