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Hope this has not been posted before , but what do you lads cover in a basic service on your Daytona? I'll be getting the main ones done at the bike shop but I'll be doing the rest. Oil, oil filter, chain clean and lube...........
 

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It's listed in your manual. Pretty simple stuff. Oil, filter, chain adj, chain lube, check brake pads, check throttle body balance. Wouldn't hurt to lube the EXUP if you live in a corrosion intensive environment.
 

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Minor service…
If it moves, lube it: Clutch and throttle cables, brake and clutch levers, shifter and rear brake leaver, stand and rider/pillion pegs pivot points, EXUP pivot points and cables, fuel cap hinge, seat release, steering dampener pivots, rear suspension pivot points and chain.
Use a dry lube, dust won't stick to it and cables prefer it.

Electrical system: All fuses, and replace any spares you may have used.
Check all your bulbs including rego plate light, and both front and rear brake switches.
Horn, pass and your kill switch too.
Battery terminals nice and tight and no fur growing on it?
Also check your charge rate, as there have been a few issues with the reg/rec this is the time to have a look at it.
Have a quick poke about at the loom, no odd wear marks where it might touch and rub the frame?

Fluids: Oil, look for any leaks around the clutch cover and oil filter/cooler and the sump plug.
You will have to check it again after you have changed the oil too.
And check the dip stick first, you will use a little oil between servicing and it's good to know how much.
Coolant, all the hose clips tight? Top up the bottle and check the radiator and the cap for any damage to the rubber seal.
Brake fluid, check the reservoirs, if I can see the level and it's Okay I tend not to open them.
Check around the callipers for any dampness if the fluid level is a little low.
Headlight fluid, to dip your lights.
Fork oil, Check the top of the dust caps for any oil seepage.

Tyres: Check for nails etc, any cuts or nicks and overall condition.
Brakes: Pad condition, if you're not sure, pull one out and have a look at it. And how do the levers feel? Not too much travel?
Clutch and throttle cables don't have too much travel?
I'll pull the air filter too just for a look, and give it a bit of a quick clean.
This is the time you also check steering head bearings and wheel bearings.

I miss anything?
Tyre pressures should be done once a week, and lube the chain (if you don't have a Scott oiler type lube system) once a week too.
If you do have an auto oil system for the chain, then make sure the reservoir is full and that it's doing its job.
Most of this the shop won't do, and it's a good time to check bolt tightness (look for fret marks) and cable condition too.

If you look after your bike, it'll look after you!
 

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quick question regarding post-storage prep. most agree that the new oil from the oil change that you put into the bike as part of the initial storage routine should be immediately popped out of the bike and new stuff put in before taking it out. this is due to harmful chemicals that accumulate with disuse. now, most people warm up the engine (thus the oil) before an oil change to get the most oil out of the engine as possible and to speed the process up. now, should this step be skipped so as not to splash all the harmful chemicals back around the crankcase, or does it not matter either way?
 

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quick question regarding post-storage prep. most agree that the new oil from the oil change that you put into the bike as part of the initial storage routine should be immediately popped out of the bike and new stuff put in before taking it out. this is due to harmful chemicals that accumulate with disuse. now, most people warm up the engine (thus the oil) before an oil change to get the most oil out of the engine as possible and to speed the process up. now, should this step be skipped so as not to splash all the harmful chemicals back around the crankcase, or does it not matter either way?
I dont think it matters. Ive changed oil when it was cold and just made sure it all drained out. You're not gonna have a catastrophic failure if you do it or not
 

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I think it's a moot point because changing the oil before and after storage is totally overkill. One or the other is fine if you used fresh synthetic oil to begin with. The only "harmful chemical" that could possibly accumulate in a few months is water.
 

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Plus IIRC with regular conventional oil if it has some use and then sits for a while it does turn acidic. I think if you use synthetic you're not as prone to it turning acidic. As MGFChapin said, the worst may be water from condensation, but even that is miniscule compared to if say your heat exchanger blows. Even if it does blow the engine runs fine...but better shut off pretty quick. That amount of water is not a good lubricant for the metals inside your engine.
 
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