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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yes, I know its a motorcycle forum. I thought I'd give it a shot. Google didn't really help much. I'm still searching though..

I'm wondering what I need to do to support the wall if I wanted to remove one stud from a wall. Don't really know if its load bearing but I just wanted to be safe if it was. Not interested in finding out if it is load bearing or not really. Just want to support it just in case... Unless someone can tell 100% if it is load bearing or not by looking at the pictures...

So, on the first picture, the stud I want to remove is the second one from the right(the ones running vertically). The other two pictures just show how the stud in question runs in between another 2x4 running horizontally and the drywall, and ends/attaches to another 2x4 also running horizontally.

So, what do y'all think? Can I just cut the stud and run another 2x4 horizontally from the stud right next to the PVC to the stud on the left of the one in question? Will that support it enough?

I appreciate any help!
Thanks
 

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(RIP) Wiser than you I was
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What could possibly go wrong. :whistle: If you're looking to make a doorway there I would put another 2 by a little to the left of the one you're looking to take out.
When you gonna quit wasting money on a silly house and get another bike?:nod:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LOL. I'm getting another bike with my taxes next month. That should be a hefty check. Plus this whole project would be like 100 bucks max... haha

I want to put a doorway there but I want it to be the size of the whole area from the 2x4 next to the PVC all the way to the wall. Like 32 inches...
 

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LOL. I'm getting another bike with my taxes next month. That should be a hefty check. Plus this whole project would be like 100 bucks max... haha

I want to put a doorway there but I want it to be the size of the whole area from the 2x4 next to the PVC all the way to the wall. Like 32 inches...
Personally, I wouldn't be OK completely removing that stud. That 3rd picture makes me wary.

What I'd do is first install another full-length stud to the far left - wherever you want the side of the door to be.

Then take 2 more 2x4s and cut them to the height you want the door to be (since it looks like it'll be shorter than full-length studs) and secure them to the full-length one you just installed and the one next to the PVC. Make sure when you measure, you account for the fact you'll want a top plate on your frame - either 1.5" if you're just going to lay a 2x4 horizontally or (my choice) 3.5" if you want to do two 2x4s across the top (standing up on their skinny edge, not laying down flat).

At that point, I'd go ahead and cut the stud out of the way. But I'd cut it to a length that, when I put the top of the door frame in, the stud rested on it. (So you're not completely removing it, just shortening it and supporting it differently.)

Install the top of the door frame. Secure the stumpy stud. Finally, I'd take 2 more short 2x4s and use them to span the gap from the original top plate and the top of the door frame next to the outside studs.

Something like this: each "|" is a single 2x4, the = are your top plates, as well as the top of the door frame. Ignore the ...s. they're just for spacing. yeesh.

===========
||.......|.......||
||.......|.......||
|==========|
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
===========

That's what I did when I built my shed, and it's freakin' solid.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't be OK completely removing that stud. That 3rd picture makes me wary.

What I'd do is first install another full-length stud to the far left - wherever you want the side of the door to be.

Then take 2 more 2x4s and cut them to the height you want the door to be (since it looks like it'll be shorter than full-length studs) and secure them to the full-length one you just installed and the one next to the PVC. Make sure when you measure, you account for the fact you'll want a top plate on your frame - either 1.5" if you're just going to lay a 2x4 horizontally or (my choice) 3.5" if you want to do two 2x4s across the top (standing up on their skinny edge, not laying down flat).

At that point, I'd go ahead and cut the stud out of the way. But I'd cut it to a length that, when I put the top of the door frame in, the stud rested on it. (So you're not completely removing it, just shortening it and supporting it differently.)

Install the top of the door frame. Secure the stumpy stud. Finally, I'd take 2 more short 2x4s and use them to span the gap from the original top plate and the top of the door frame next to the outside studs.

Something like this: each "|" is a single 2x4, the = are your top plates, as well as the top of the door frame. Ignore the ...s. they're just for spacing. yeesh.

===========
||.......|.......||
||.......|.......||
|==========|
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
===========

That's what I did when I built my shed, and it's freakin' solid.
:notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:...couldn't have said it better. Her suggestion really tops mine too.

U are the ultimate :curtsey:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Personally, I wouldn't be OK completely removing that stud. That 3rd picture makes me wary.

What I'd do is first install another full-length stud to the far left - wherever you want the side of the door to be.

Then take 2 more 2x4s and cut them to the height you want the door to be (since it looks like it'll be shorter than full-length studs) and secure them to the full-length one you just installed and the one next to the PVC. Make sure when you measure, you account for the fact you'll want a top plate on your frame - either 1.5" if you're just going to lay a 2x4 horizontally or (my choice) 3.5" if you want to do two 2x4s across the top (standing up on their skinny edge, not laying down flat).

At that point, I'd go ahead and cut the stud out of the way. But I'd cut it to a length that, when I put the top of the door frame in, the stud rested on it. (So you're not completely removing it, just shortening it and supporting it differently.)

Install the top of the door frame. Secure the stumpy stud. Finally, I'd take 2 more short 2x4s and use them to span the gap from the original top plate and the top of the door frame next to the outside studs.

Something like this: each "|" is a single 2x4, the = are your top plates, as well as the top of the door frame. Ignore the ...s. they're just for spacing. yeesh.

===========
||.......|.......||
||.......|.......||
|==========|
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
||...............||
===========

That's what I did when I built my shed, and it's freakin' solid.
There is another stud on the far left, you just can't see it cuz the other stud on the left wall is blocking its view. I want the door to span from the blocked-from-view stud, to the stud next to the PVC.

I was just going to make the door a piece of plywood with some hinges on it, and attach it to the existing stud next to the PVC. But your idea is perfect and solves the problem just in case it is a load bearing wall. (and it'll look a lot better too)
I'm pretty sure I got everything you explained.

Thanks so much!!! :thumbup:
:notworthy:
 

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My dad used to build houses a few years ago. you'll want a Header in the to keep the door frame from sagging.
two 2x12's doubled up, so they're the same width as the door frame.
Like this:

/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Exactly. I wouldn't be worried about removing a single stud as long as it is properly supported afterward. It won't immediately sag with just one missing stud but will over time.

What could possibly go wrong. :whistle: If you're looking to make a doorway there I would put another 2 by a little to the left of the one you're looking to take out.
When you gonna quit wasting money on a silly house and get another bike?:nod:
I've heard that a time or two...
 

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My dad used to build houses a few years ago. you'll want a Header in the to keep the door frame from sagging.
two 2x12's doubled up, so they're the same width as the door frame.
He must've built cold war bunkers, as that 2"X12" header is totally overkill. Sheeesh! For a 32" door, 2"X6" or 8" is adequate.

In the picture, there's a 2"X4" installed horizontally. You can leave that out and just install the header on top of the vertical studs. You'd need to continue those vertical studs, above the header, like Sha's most-excellent illustration.

 

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Hey Tony,

With your Depot pricing, why not just grab one of those cheap, pre-hung, hollow interior doors? They can't be much more than $60. Then, you'd have a door that's framed and would look infinitely more times better than a shit piece of plywood hinged from even shittier hinges. Also, there should be a dent/damage/return section with something usable. Don't forget surplus and helping hand(?) stores.
 

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:notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:...couldn't have said it better. Her suggestion really tops mine too.

U are the ultimate :curtsey:
Aaaaaaaawwww, thanks Matt. :indeed: You're just buttering me up so I'll build your house for you. :wink: :grin:

Thanks so much!!! :thumbup:
:notworthy:
:curtsey: My pleasure. :D

I was just going to make the door a piece of plywood with some hinges on it, and attach it to the existing stud next to the PVC. But your idea is perfect and solves the problem just in case it is a load bearing wall. (and it'll look a lot better too)
That's basically what I did on the shed. The doors don't look too crappy and, most importantly, when I close them, they don't move at all, so I was able to wire the shed into my home alarm system. Suh-weet.

I did build a frame for the doors, though - a support structure built out of 1bys that I put the hinges on, and then attached the plywood/siding to that. Keeps the siding from warping (and made it possible to put on some heavy-duty locking hardware). Ummmmm.... pic attached. You can kinda see the support (it's in the front, being held on by the 2 clamps since it is pre-hinge).

You can also see the framing around the door (with an extra - 3rd - 2x4 on each side. I don't under-engineer.) Lots of short, stubby studs on top of the door frame since the door is 6' feet wide and I stuck with the 18"OC spacing.

Ken's ideer of a pre-hung door is purty durn good, too. If it were cheap enough, I'd go that route, esp. since it is indoors! I didn't care how the shed looks, since it is just temporary until I can build a garage, but for something inside...?

My dad used to build houses a few years ago. you'll want a Header in the to keep the door frame from sagging.
two 2x12's doubled up, so they're the same width as the door frame.
Like this:
Are those even 2x12s?! It looks like 2x6 construction, to me... :1drool:
 

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Holy crap! You go girl. Not many women would be willing to tackle that. :notworthy:
:indeed: Thanks, Ken!! :grin: I needed some place to put the bikes other than my living room, so... until I can build a real garage, I built the shed.

It was a great dry run to see if I really could design and execute something structurally sound. I already know I can do wiring, plumbing, HVAC & insulation to code, so when it comes time to do a real garage (3-4 bays wide, with one bay being tandem to provide plenty of room for vehicles & motorcycle- and woodworking-shops, and an extension to the master br above the garage itself), I'll just need someone to pour the foundation, do the roof, and make some modifications to my existing house. The rest I can do myself. Should be able to do it on the relative cheap!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hey Tony,

With your Depot pricing, why not just grab one of those cheap, pre-hung, hollow interior doors? They can't be much more than $60. Then, you'd have a door that's framed and would look infinitely more times better than a shit piece of plywood hinged from even shittier hinges. Also, there should be a dent/damage/return section with something usable. Don't forget surplus and helping hand(?) stores.
My Depot pricing? lol. We don't get discounts.
I can't use a pre-hung door. The height of the door was going to be about 3 feet tall. I'd have to cut the door in half or something.
I was gonna use nice plywood! Haha. It's just a lil storage area... not a doorway for a room or anything. I wanted to do a nice lil pocket door, but the PVC stops me from being able to do that.

Damn Sha! You'ze a balla, playa!
 

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My Depot pricing? lol. We don't get discounts.
As you know, I work for a restaurant food distributor. We used to have employee purchase. The employee pricing is more than the restaurants pay. Doesn't matter, as they took that "benefit" from us, a couple months ago. I only ever bought 2 things in five years, as it's processed crap. They really hurt my feelings with that one. :laugh:

I can't use a pre-hung door. The height of the door was going to be about 3 feet tall. I'd have to cut the door in half or something.
Oh, I never paid attention to the scale of the opening.

You can't cut a hollow-core door. It only has horizontal structure at the top, bottom, and usually one somewhere across where the door knob would go. The bottom horizontal structure is taller than the others, so you can cut the bottom of the door for flooring/carpet clearance or non-standard opening height.

I was gonna use nice plywood! Haha.
Sorry, I can't resist giving you crap. :rofl2:

BTW, you'd better be out riding that Scott. I know you got a bit of snow, last weekend, but, that's all gone. So, no excuses. (I'm through ATL, every Saturday PM and Monday PM :whistle:).

Last week on the MTB.


Last week on the 'cross and studs.


The week before. Finished at 26 degrees. Same trail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As you know, I work for a restaurant food distributor. We used to have employee purchase. The employee pricing is more than the restaurants pay. Doesn't matter, as they took that "benefit" from us, a couple months ago. I only ever bought 2 things in five years, as it's processed crap. They really hurt my feelings with that one. :laugh:
Oh, I never paid attention to the scale of the opening.

You can't cut a hollow-core door. It only has horizontal structure at the top, bottom, and usually one somewhere across where the door knob would go. The bottom horizontal structure is taller than the others, so you can cut the bottom of the door for flooring/carpet clearance or non-standard opening height.
Yessir, exactly....

Sorry, I can't resist giving you crap. :rofl2:

BTW, you'd better be out riding that Scott. I know you got a bit of snow, last weekend, but, that's all gone. So, no excuses. (I'm through ATL, every Saturday PM and Monday PM :whistle:).

Last week on the MTB.


Last week on the 'cross and studs.


The week before. Finished at 26 degrees. Same trail.
I actually just finally bought some winter stuff to ride in. I haven't ridden in a few months. Was gonna ride today but had to stay at work late.
Now that I got some good winter gear I'll definitely pick back up.

Looks like fun on the mountain bike though! Cool pics. :thumbup:
 
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