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The OEM O2 sensor's main purpose is to keep the bike within the manufacturer's required emissions settings, which is generally done under light load, i.e. wherever the Euro regulators test the bike for noise and carbon emissions (at cold start and again up to 125 km/h).

A side benefit of the sensor is to help adapt the fueling to small changes, e.g. if you're riding from the beach to high mountains, it can compensate for the elevation change. It can't compensate alone for large changes like your Bodis headers; that's where the PCV's base map comes in.

The O2 sensor wouldn't override the PCV's settings by more than a couple percent, so it's not something I'd worry about, even for a race bike. Nevertheless, it's an added component that I've chosen to do without. Remember, it was originally designed to work with the stock exhaust and a functional SAI system. With de-cat headers, you should have blocked off the SAI already and that will drastically enrich the fuel/air readings at the O2 sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
The OEM O2 sensor's main purpose is to keep the bike within the manufacturer's required emissions settings, which is generally done under light load, i.e. wherever the Euro regulators test the bike for noise and carbon emissions (at cold start and again up to 125 km/h).

A side benefit of the sensor is to help adapt the fueling to small changes, e.g. if you're riding from the beach to high mountains, it can compensate for the elevation change. It can't compensate alone for large changes like your Bodis headers; that's where the PCV's base map comes in.

The O2 sensor wouldn't override the PCV's settings by more than a couple percent, so it's not something I'd worry about, even for a race bike. Nevertheless, it's an added component that I've chosen to do without. Remember, it was originally designed to work with the stock exhaust and a functional SAI system. With de-cat headers, you should have blocked off the SAI already and that will drastically enrich the fuel/air readings at the O2 sensor.
Thanks.
So any changes to the PCV map for light load (up to 40% throttle, and 7500 RPM as per DynoJet) will be used, but the ECU will "adjust" by a couple percentage points. Am i getting this right? Keep in mind this range will be adjusted on the PCV map for better rideability (on/off throttle response, for example), so if I'm getting this correctly, I will be able to work on this range only with a small input from stock ECU?
 

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Thanks.
So any changes to the PCV map for light load (up to 40% throttle, and 7500 RPM as per DynoJet) will be used, but the ECU will "adjust" by a couple percentage points. Am i getting this right? Keep in mind this range will be adjusted on the PCV map for better rideability (on/off throttle response, for example), so if I'm getting this correctly, I will be able to work on this range only with a small input from stock ECU?
Yes, sounds like you've got it. The PCV is "downstream" of the ECU where it connects to the injectors, so let's say the ECU tells the injectors "provide X amount of fuel," the PCV will say "actually, let's do X + 10." The ECU will see this in the O2 sensor and try to lean out, but it can only do so up to a max amount until it essentially gives up, with the PCV overriding it the whole time anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Project completed.
Could not be happier with the results. The bike is unrecognizable. A complete monster and yet extremely smooth all over.

This will get a separate detailed post but I know better than to end this without a dyno graph.


Cheers guys and thanks for all the help and input.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hey boss, congratulations on your bike. Awesome gains. I have a 2017 675r and was looking to go along a similar route with my bike. How would you say the comparison in horsepower, torque, throttle response, etc.. is to stock? I'm also curious as to what this all ended up costing in the end?
 

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Project completed.
Could not be happier with the results. The bike is unrecognizable. A complete monster and yet extremely smooth all over.

This will get a separate detailed post but I know better than to end this without a dyno graph.


Cheers guys and thanks for all the help and input.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Awesome results! Congratulations, I bet its a blast to ride!

So on your 2014 Daytona your performance mods were:
-Bodis headers
-SC Project CR-T slip on
-K&N replacement filter (non-race)
-PCV dyno tuning

Did you happen to use aftermarket velocity stacks? If so, i probably overlooked it when reading.

Also, did you happen to take any comparison photos of the stock Daytona header vs the Bodis?

*Do you or anyone else by chance, know what the Bodis header primary diameters are and the collector outlet diameter?

Thanks for the updates, awesome ride for sure!
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Awesome results! Congratulations, I bet its a blast to ride!

So on your 2014 Daytona your performance mods were:

-Bodis headers

-SC Project CR-T slip on

-K&N replacement filter (non-race)

-PCV dyno tuning

Did you happen to use aftermarket velocity stacks? If so, i probably overlooked it when reading.

Also, did you happen to take any comparison photos of the stock Daytona header vs the Bodis?

*Do you or anyone else by chance, know what the Bodis header primary diameters are and the collector outlet diameter?

Thanks for the updates, awesome ride for sure!
Hi
Yes I did use velocity stacks.
Stock headers are a piece of junk compared to Bodis. Also weighed everything and compared!
Will get a post in a couple of hours with ALL the nerdy details. You're in for a treat!

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
*Do you or anyone else by chance, know what the Bodis header primary diameters are and the collector outlet diameter?
Sorry forgot to answer your question.
I'm not sure what the exact diameters are but the outlet diameter is exactly the same as the stock. This header kit fits the stock muffler so it will be the exact same size as the stock collector outlet. Also it will fit any aftermarket slip in for this bike.

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Sorry forgot to answer your question.
I'm not sure what the exact diameters are but the outlet diameter is exactly the same as the stock. This header kit fits the stock muffler so it will be the exact same size as the stock collector outlet. Also it will fit any aftermarket slip in for this bike.

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Is the BODIS header based off the Akrapovic design for either street or daytona?

I
 

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I would like to have bit more power, but can't really afford now for a new bike. So I started to think about that if I mod the current bike all the way to get more power. Street Triple has cast pistons and rods and I think that these are the weak point, so it might be good idea to upgrade these to Daytona 675 rods & pistons that are forged?

I currently got:
- Arrow low boy 3-1 full exhaust.
- Daytona cams.
- Velocity stacks.

I can spend some "good" cash to it if I will get proper results with it because I really like the bike and it allready has some good upgrades on it. Like Ohlins fork and shock.

What I'm thinking:
- Cylinder head porting & skimming.
- Thinner gasket.
- Cams re-profiled by ukrs.
- Race kit generator kit.
Yea, these aren't cheap, but way more less than new bike that I would like to get. Any thoughts and what kind of power I could get with these mods done? Might also be ok without the cam re-profiling abd race generator kit because these are bloody expensive, but in the other hand they shoud give 10hp more together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
I would like to have bit more power, but can't really afford now for a new bike. So I started to think about that if I mod the current bike all the way to get more power. Street Triple has cast pistons and rods and I think that these are the weak point, so it might be good idea to upgrade these to Daytona 675 rods & pistons that are forged?

I currently got:
- Arrow low boy 3-1 full exhaust.
- Daytona cams.
- Velocity stacks.

I can spend some "good" cash to it if I will get proper results with it because I really like the bike and it allready has some good upgrades on it. Like Ohlins fork and shock.

What I'm thinking:
- Cylinder head porting & skimming.
- Thinner gasket.
- Cams re-profiled by ukrs.
- Race kit generator kit.
Yea, these aren't cheap, but way more less than new bike that I would like to get. Any thoughts and what kind of power I could get with these mods done? Might also be ok without the cam re-profiling abd race generator kit because these are bloody expensive, but in the other hand they shoud give 10hp more together.
Well this was exactly the dilemma that I was in before I decided to go ahead.

Basically you have to make a decision based on so many variables:

1 - How much power do you want?
Are you looking for a few HP to make the bike feel a bit more alive and aggressive? Or are you riding on a big track and getting left behind by supersports and want to keep up?
Expecting 20-30 HP from a few bolt on budget mods is unrealistic and likely to end in disappointment.

2 - How attached are you to your current bike?
I couldn't get myself to part with it, which weighed heavily in the decision to mod instead of trading the bike.

3 - budget.
I might disagree with you on one thing. If you can sell your bike for a decent price, all the money you would spend on the mods might add up and get you a decent upgrade. If I had decided to go that way, given what the mods cost me, I would have been able to get a brand new 2017 CBR 1000RR, which was on sale when I was debating this issue. That would have cost me a few 100 $ more and would have been doable. But, since my answer to point #2 above was "very", and to point #1 was "not much", I decided against that. I am very happy with my choice so far.

So my advice, think about what you need and how much it will cost you to get it. Do some math and check out some used bikes with more power. Maybe you can get a good deal and save yourself the hassle.
On the other hand you might decide that you don't need so much power and that you would rather keep your trusty bike, like I did, and that's fine of course.

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