Triumph 675 Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There were a lot of threads in archive that didn't have the info i needed Didn't want to drag them up.

All the bikes I owned before my 675 when i wanted to get power off the line, I would get the revs up at the line/light, not dump the clutch, but kinda cltuch enough to keep the revs in the powerband and off id go.
I don't know if it is the power of the 675, but i am getting more adventurous, and it feels like the 675 is a bike that you have to have either clutch, half clutch. There's not a great deal of linearity and the the back wheel threatens to bite you, or the front wheel get up

Does a slipper clutch give you that increased range of clutch motion, so you dont risk dumping all that HP.
I wonder if you can get cams that give you some more range on the clutch cable similar to throttle.

Any knowledge info help on this aprreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
afaik....a slipper clutch won't help you in this respect. a quick wiki search:

if you want more range of motion with the clutch, just play around with the clutch cable adjusters to your liking. the 675 has A LOT of torque down low. for my 675, i don't need to keep the revs up at the light....when it turns green, i just twist the throttle while releasing the clutch and off i go. if you're talking about a fast launch....you're most likely going to bring up the front wheel anyway...

i guess to better phrase my answer.....what are you looking for? smoother acceleration off the line? fast acceleration off the line without bringing the wheel up? a lot of "off the line" issues can be fixed with practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Slipper clutch is for downshifting only. Has no effect on clutch release or take off. It prevents/lessens the effects of engine braking when down shifting. Stops the rear wheel from hopping all over the place when down shifting several gears. Great for track riding/racing. No real benefit on the street.



/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
I'd say it gives less worries on the street, but the point is it won't change the clutch release problem you have.

I suggest you try using lower revs or more delicate throttle and clutch control if the adjustments don't help, but a simple and radical solution would be taller gearing...

Fact is, the torque is plentiful, so you have to be reasonable, but you might also want to adjust your suspension properly, so the front doesn't lift too easily, and your position so you load it as much as possible.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Slipper clutch is for downshifting only. Has no effect on clutch release or take off. It prevents/lessens the effects of engine braking when down shifting. Stops the rear wheel from hopping all over the place when down shifting several gears. Great for track riding/racing. No real benefit on the street.

/
K, think i understand. Learnt not to downshift above 10k awhile ago so no problems there.

To give the OP some clarity im comparing the clutch to that of my previous 250 RS-250, a bike which You had to had use a lot of clutch to stay in the powerband, or she would bog down on you.
Obviously not the best comparison.

As long as the clutch is progressive (most of them are by nature) And im not destroying it having it slightly engaged through the corners, it's all good.

I think having 125 psi instead of 45 psi on the same length of cable pull is gonna produce the effect.

Am interested if/how the pull on the clutch cable is adjusted. The whole range is in the first inch of lever on my bike, leaving a lot of lever range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
So does a slipper clutch make that much of a difference? I've never had any downshifting problems on my sumo and everyone told me to get a slipper clutch for it. I'm under the impression that you brake, then downshift at high revs to avoid floating the rear tire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,856 Posts
Bike is an 09..
You've already got the taller 1st gear then, not much you can do except adjust where the friction zone is, not how wide it is. You adjust with the knob at the base of the lever. If that's not enough you can also adjust the cables at the throttle bodies. Otherwise you'll just have to get used to it, like you said it's not a 2 stroke, it simply doesn't need much clutch slip.

So does a slipper clutch make that much of a difference? I've never had any downshifting problems on my sumo and everyone told me to get a slipper clutch for it. I'm under the impression that you brake, then downshift at high revs to avoid floating the rear tire?
Yeah it makes a huge difference but only if you're going fast enough to need it. If you're not regularly backing your sumo into corners and feeling rear wheel hop, you probably wouldn't notice a slipper's benefits. You might notice decreased engine braking which isn't a good thing to everyone.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have heard of this shifting term
Im am not sure if what i do is blip downshifting, but I am a fan of engine braking and only freewheel the clutch in corners or situations where you have the time to be as smooth as possible, and dont need acceleration.
Other times i use some throttle when downshiftin as it seems to make for a faster transition.
I will use enough throttle that the engine wont rev up during the clutch, but will stay in the same revs for the next gear.

It is more like not closing the throtte than "blipping" it tho.
Like i said maybe i am doing it wrong
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I'm still not sure what you're looking for from your original question... are you just talking about normal starts on the street, or are you trying to get an optimal launch on the track? The 675 has enough torque to start in 2nd gear (do it by accident occasionally), and I feel it's quite forgiving as far as normal/street starts. Racing is an entirely different matter - you do rev the engine and are trying to release the clutch ASAP but smoothly without bringing up the front wheel too high. Ideally, the front wheel should just be off the ground for max acceleration (very hard to achieve...). Also, being smooth (esp. in corners) is mainly throttle control - I've not heard of anyone using the clutch while cornering ...seems superfluous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
The 675 has enough torque to start in 2nd gear (do it by accident occasionally)
Enough torque to get started in 5th gear actually....I've tried when my shift lever snapped and I could only shift at a stand still.....of course acceleration off the line required some clutch control and was slow as heck....but I needed highway speeds so just rode to the shop in 5th :laugh:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm still not sure what you're looking for from your original question... are you just talking about normal starts on the street, or are you trying to get an optimal launch on the track? The 675 has enough torque to start in 2nd gear (do it by accident occasionally), and I feel it's quite forgiving as far as normal/street starts. Racing is an entirely different matter - you do rev the engine and are trying to release the clutch ASAP but smoothly without bringing up the front wheel too high. Ideally, the front wheel should just be off the ground for max acceleration (very hard to achieve...). Also, being smooth (esp. in corners) is mainly throttle control - I've not heard of anyone using the clutch while cornering ...seems superfluous.
The original question was just inquiring as to whether and what slipper clutches are, and then ppl talking about how they only relate to downshifting. I think then i was talking about the optimal "blip" method of downshfiting, and my interpretation of it.
Being smooth thru the corners I was mostly talking about changing gears and how i basically shift slower to make sure i dont lock the rear wheel.
As for using the clutch thru corners, this is a personal thing for me. I find the throttle can be a bit twitchy 1st-2nd gear on a mountain road hairpin, and I will use a bit of clutch the keep the power delivery smooth, or maybe take some load off the rear. i dont think i use it once im above 2nd gear.
I've ridden the bike long enough to know what works for me, gives me confidence so I'll stick with it.
If im doing it wrong, so be it, and i guess it comes from riding smaller capacity 2 strokes where using the clutch/throttle in combination sometimes was non-superflous
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm still not sure what you're looking for from your original question... are you just talking about normal starts on the street, or are you trying to get an optimal launch on the track? The 675 has enough torque to start in 2nd gear (do it by accident occasionally), and I feel it's quite forgiving as far as normal/street starts. Racing is an entirely different matter - you do rev the engine and are trying to release the clutch ASAP but smoothly without bringing up the front wheel too high. Ideally, the front wheel should just be off the ground for max acceleration (very hard to achieve...). Also, being smooth (esp. in corners) is mainly throttle control - I've not heard of anyone using the clutch while cornering ...seems superfluous.
The original question was just inquiring as to whether and what slipper clutches are, and how they only relate to downshifting. I think then i was talking about the optimal "blip" method of downshfiting, and my interpretation of it.
Being smooth thru the corners I was mostly talking about changing gears and how i basically shift slower to make sure i dont lock the rear wheel.
As for using the clutch thru corners, this is a personal thing for me. I find the throttle can be a bit twitchy 1st-2nd gear on a mountain road hairpin, and I will use a bit of clutch the keep the power delivery smooth, or maybe take some load off the rear. i dont think i use it once im above 2nd gear.
I've ridden the bike long enough to know what works for me, gives me confidence so I'll stick with it.
If im doing it wrong, so be it, and i guess it comes from riding smaller capacity 2 strokes where using the clutch/throttle in combination sometimes was non-superflous
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
The original question was just inquiring as to whether and what slipper clutches are, and how they only relate to downshifting. I think then i was talking about the optimal "blip" method of downshfiting, and my interpretation of it.
Being smooth thru the corners I was mostly talking about changing gears and how i basically shift slower to make sure i dont lock the rear wheel.
As for using the clutch thru corners, this is a personal thing for me. I find the throttle can be a bit twitchy 1st-2nd gear on a mountain road hairpin, and I will use a bit of clutch the keep the power delivery smooth, or maybe take some load off the rear. i dont think i use it once im above 2nd gear.
I've ridden the bike long enough to know what works for me, gives me confidence so I'll stick with it.
If im doing it wrong, so be it, and i guess it comes from riding smaller capacity 2 strokes where using the clutch/throttle in combination sometimes was non-superflous
Gotcha. One thing I do miss about carbureted bikes was the nice smooth off->on power transition. No FI bike I've ever ridden has ever been smooth (some have been scary bad). Once the power's on, I just try to be extra smooth with the throttle. (I've got a quick turn throttle which makes that very hard.) Street pace riding over rough roads and trying to hold steady throttle is difficult - whatever works for you is cool.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thx for the info on the slipper-clutch/method
If caberators were the analog, then fuel injection is certainly digital.

going off topic 4 a sec..
Riding yesterday I decided some ergonomics could improve my technique more than anything else

I have some speedymoto risers on order, to bring the front up and back some. Also ordered some (standard) ASV levers. Have $10 till next pay lol
I dont know that the '100' claimed adjustments gets the lever any closer than the '6' setting on the nissins, but hopefully I can start using two fingers again :smile"
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top