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Hi everyone,

As all of us encounter eventually in our lives, had a major few life decisions that made me park my bike for 2 years. 2016 Street Triple R w/ABS.

I can assume battery should be changed, that’s for certain, but I can only imagine the fuel system will need to be cleaned, as well as potentially suspension components and tires for sure as they where old when I parked it.

That being said, is there a recommended checklist of components to clean/check/replace for these bikes in these situations? If so, how difficult said tasks would be for a novice? I don’t mind going out and getting special tools or parts, would probably have to order as my two closest dealers both closed their doors due to a certain disease that spread. Thank you for the help!
 

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Two years isn't that long. Much depends on where you live (climate wise) and how it was stored. I've purchased bikes that have sat much longer than that. In one case 8 years.

Battery will certainly have to be charged, probably replaced. Buy a lithium, the extra cost is worth it.

Depending on the quality of the gas you had in it and how much (more being better) she may start up. In which case add fresh and run out the whole tank to be rid of it. Add a fuel system cleaning additive like Techron.

The super safe thing to do would be to drain the tank and add fresh before attempting to start but unless I thought water had gotten into it I'd try it with the existing. You could also pull the plugs and add a drop of oil in each cylinder depending on how anal you want to get.

Just sitting indoors isn't going to age out your tires. If bike's been in the elements replace them. The date of manufacture will be printed on the side of your tires. Tires age out 5 years after that date (super safe) or 10 years (realistically).

Suspension components don't age by sitting a few years but your fork oil change interval is likely due.

Change oil, lube chain and you're good to go.
 

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One thing to be aware of is the fuel sensor assembly. My bike sat for a couple years and as the water separated out of the gas, and rust built up over the sensor. It indicated no fuel regardless of the actual gas level. Triumph wanted $1k to replace the entire fuel system, but a quick disassembly and clearning of the sensor put everything back right.
 
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