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They can harden up over time and be really difficult to get out. It's OK to get a small propane torch to heat up the fork tube. The metal tube will expand while the seal will stay mostly the same size and should be easier to pry out. You can also cut the dust seal on one or two sides.
will the reverse be valid? - i.e. when I try to put the new dust seal back on, it doesn't go in

more info on my suffering here: http://www.s1000rrforum.com/forum/s1000rr-hp4-do-yourself/17508-fork-oil-change-diy-12.html

as a last resort I was thinking to heat up the golden tube, but my concern is that the silver tube is already in (with the oil seal in place already). When (if) I apply the heat, won't the inner silver tube expand too, causing permanent deformation to the new seal which is ON THE TUBE now???
 

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Some dust caps actually have a recessed grove in the fork they lock into. They are extremely hard to get out and just as hard to reinstall. We use to use silicone adhesive (rtv) for lubricant installing them. Just a little bit. You'd hold one side down by hand with all your strength as you knocked the other side in level with a mallet and then quickly tap all the the way around until it was all the way in. if you slipped they'd pop back out on you. It was usually easier to install the dust seal on those forks before refitting the stanchion tube. With the tube out of the way you could use a large seal driver or huge socket and knock the entire seal in at once with a large mallet. I don't really mess with modern forks. I'm spoiled now I have an excellent suspension shop a couple miles from home and they really don't charge much. I'd rather let the pros do it then fiddling around trying to use make shift tools. Not to mention with the amount of forks they do they are better at identifying issue or making small changes that will make the fork work better and they have parts on hand.
 

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Some dust caps actually have a recessed grove in the fork they lock into. They are extremely hard to get out and just as hard to reinstall. We use to use silicone adhesive (rtv) for lubricant installing them. Just a little bit. You'd hold one side down by hand with all your strength as you knocked the other side in level with a mallet and then quickly tap all the the way around until it was all the way in. if you slipped they'd pop back out on you. It was usually easier to install the dust seal on those forks before refitting the stanchion tube. With the tube out of the way you could use a large seal driver or huge socket and knock the entire seal in at once with a large mallet. I don't really mess with modern forks. I'm spoiled now I have an excellent suspension shop a couple miles from home and they really don't charge much. I'd rather let the pros do it then fiddling around trying to use make shift tools. Not to mention with the amount of forks they do they are better at identifying issue or making small changes that will make the fork work better and they have parts on hand.
thank you for this idea. Yes, the dust cap was so hard to get out (it seemed to me to be glued in ) that I ended up destroying it.

I already put everything including the dust cap onto the silver inner tube - the BMW service manual (RDS) told me so. I would rather try the mallet around the inner tube first, if nothing else will work, i will take everything apart :frown2:
 

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Discussion Starter #224
I put seal grease on the inner and outer lips of the dust seal, and they usually push in fairly easily. If not, I use a 43mm seal driver to ram it home. Probably not a great idea to use heat once the oil seal is already in place.

If that fails, you can carefully separate the two tubes and it shouldn't hurt the oil seal.
 

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I put seal grease on the inner and outer lips of the dust seal, and they usually push in fairly easily. If not, I use a 43mm seal driver to ram it home. Probably not a great idea to use heat once the oil seal is already in place.

If that fails, you can carefully separate the two tubes and it shouldn't hurt the oil seal.
where do you buy your seal drivers from? I bought a "universal" one from amazon, which has 2 drivers (a small and a large one), however they are not comfortable. I wish I have bought one driver for my BMW fork and one driver for my striple fork, but it is not too late to buy them now. A suggestion of a verified quality manufacture is welcomed, many thanks!
 

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I have the Motion Pro as well, works good. Keep an eye out on ebay, if your timing's right, you'd be surprised at the deals you can come across on suspension tools. I snagged a new Race Tech spring compressor tool for $75. Much, much more preferable to that little hand-job thingy that takes 3 strong hands.
 

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I used a 100mm length of 55mm diameter poly pipe with a 7mm slice removed. You can open it up to put it round the fork leg, then squeeze it closed and its the right size to push the seal down into the recess in the leg. I intended to put cable ties round it to squeeze it together but in fact it was easy to just hold it tight and gently push down on the seal which seated really easily.
 

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Hi guys! Hope someone got the time to answer a few questions about my bikes (daytona 675 -10) suspension. Found this thread and it still seems to be alive after 8 years.. amazing!! :smile2: and thank you MGFChapin for a nice DIY walkthrough! I've had severals motorcycles through the years but never had the opportunity to do anything with them becuase my lack of space at home. I'm a cheap charlie (like others here apparently :grin2:) and of course interest, and would like to make most tools by myself. Thats no problem since we got a good workshop at work. The only one I cannot find in this thread are good pics or dimensions of the cartridge holder except that it's a 28mm castle nut? Did anyone solve this and made a tool? :smile2: I am also curious about the grade of fork oil. Most of you seems to use a 5w fork oil but is this only to prefer when doing lots of trackdays? I do some trackdays but use the bike in traffic from time to time as well. Is it a weight issue when it comes to the rider?

Thanks and ride safe! :bowdown:
 

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Discussion Starter #231
I am also curious about the grade of fork oil. Most of you seems to use a 5w fork oil but is this only to prefer when doing lots of trackdays? I do some trackdays but use the bike in traffic from time to time as well. Is it a weight issue when it comes to the rider?
Can't really help you with the cartridge holder except to provide any dimensions you need. The Race Tech one works great and is well worth the money, IMO. I've probably used it 30 times since I first wrote this how-to.

As for weight, I've found the 5wt is best across the board for street or track. It has nothing to do with rider weight and everything to do with allowing the cartridges to move with the road surface and provide better feedback to the rider. You'll notice that with the lighter oil, damping adjustments will be more noticeable and you can always tune out too much feedback with a softer setting.
 

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Well I only need the outer/inner diameter of the holder and its grooves depth/width. Got milling machines and lathes at work so should be no problem to fabricate my own :smile2:

I see, and you still use same base settings for the forks as if it was a 7,5w or 10w oil and adjust from that if needed.

Many thanks for your answer and time :)
 

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Hey I have a 15 675 non r and I just want to double check that these steps correlate to my forks still? I've had my bike since new and haven't changed the fork oil so it is past due but I also have some other questions would you still recommend the 5w motul oil for my forks and what size is your cartridge holding tool I want to make sure I buy the right tools the first time. This is my first time doing this but I like to think I'm mechanically inclined thanks for any help
 

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Discussion Starter #234
Well I only need the outer/inner diameter of the holder and its grooves depth/width.
Sorry, got caught up in fun stuff for the New Year and totally forgot about this. Overall length of the holder is 140 mm. The OD at the grooves is 27.5 mm, the ID is 23.8 mm. Each groove is 11.8 mm wide (linear, remember there's a slight curve to them) and 3.8 mm deep.

Hey I have a 15 675 non r and I just want to double check that these steps correlate to my forks still? I've had my bike since new and haven't changed the fork oil so it is past due but I also have some other questions would you still recommend the 5w motul oil for my forks and what size is your cartridge holding tool I want to make sure I buy the right tools the first time. This is my first time doing this but I like to think I'm mechanically inclined thanks for any help
Yes, your 15 non-R forks will have the same procedure and yes, I still recommend 5 wt oil. The Race Tech holding tool I use is TFCH 01.
 

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Sorry, got caught up in fun stuff for the New Year and totally forgot about this. Overall length of the holder is 140 mm. The OD at the grooves is 27.5 mm, the ID is 23.8 mm. Each groove is 11.8 mm wide (linear, remember there's a slight curve to them) and 3.8 mm deep.

No worries mate, I understand you've got better things to do than answering ppl on forums all the time :laugh2: I'm happy you took your time answering my questions though, thank you once more :bowdown:
 

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Sorry, got caught up in fun stuff for the New Year and totally forgot about this. Overall length of the holder is 140 mm. The OD at the grooves is 27.5 mm, the ID is 23.8 mm. Each groove is 11.8 mm wide (linear, remember there's a slight curve to them) and 3.8 mm deep.

Yes, your 15 non-R forks will have the same procedure and yes, I still recommend 5 wt oil. The Race Tech holding tool I use is TFCH 01.
Hi, iam currently servicing my 13+ Non-R Forks, and following your How to. I believe the newer gen forks are not the same length as the older gen would 110mm Gap still work? Also, what would cause the used fork seals not to keep working if removed carefully? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #237
Hi, iam currently servicing my 13+ Non-R Forks, and following your How to. I believe the newer gen forks are not the same length as the older gen would 110mm Gap still work? Also, what would cause the used fork seals not to keep working if removed carefully? Thanks!
Yes, anywhere from 110 to 120 mm is a good air gap for Kayaba forks

There isn't really a careful way I've seen to remove old fork seals. They're wedged in pretty tightly and prying them out is the only way I've ever seen it done, which will absolutely warp them. If you're looking to save a buck, both Race Tech and K-Tech sell their own seals that are cheaper than OEM but still good quality.
 

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Hi All just finished reading all the pages here. I have a leaking fork seal that I want to replace. Do I have to remove the cartridge or can I get away with just replacing the oil and the seals? I dont do track. Also can I use a ruler or some type of stick to measure the oil level in the tube? Oh and one last thing, Could I use a PVC type pipe to press the seals in?
 

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Discussion Starter #240
You can get the outer fork tube off without having to remove the cartridge.

A stick, ruler, whatever is fine as long as you can accurately see where it gets wet.

A PVC pipe might not have enough heft to slam the oil seal home. You need to make sure it's exactly the correct diameter. The easiest way to get a seal in is to heat the fork tube up with a propane torch for 30 seconds or so, then the seal should press in just about barehanded. Help from a slightly smaller-diameter washer or PVC pipe should get the job done.
 
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