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Just wanted to give an update. I once again used this thread to replace the fluids and fork seals (I had one leaking). Since my buddy moved that had the tools I have been slowly acquiring them. I decided to buy the Motion Pro 08-0648 5 in 1 damper rod bleed tool. I liked the idea of having no removable parts to get lost. I have to report that it does not work without a fair amount of difficulty. One side has three different thread sizes (M10 x 1.0, M12 x 1.0, & M14 x 1.0) and the other side has two (M10 x 1.25 & M12 x 1.25). The threads on the damper rod for our bikes are M10 x 1.0. In order to get the tool to thread on you have to remove the lock nut because the M10 x 1.0 threads are at the furthest point inside the bleed tool. That is OK when you are just using the tool to pump the damper rod to bleed the air, but makes it impossible to use when trying to lift the damper rod up through the pvc in order to thread on the fork cap. In order to get it to work to its fullest capacity I am going to cut off the end that has the M14 x 1.0 threads.
 

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Good to know. Could you also use a magnet to fish the rod out of the bottom of the fork?
 

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Spring swap info included!

Just wanted to share my recent fork spring swap/service experience, it might help others that have not done this and are considering it.

First off - a HUGE thanks to MGFChapin for detailing this procedure in a clear, easy-to-follow format! I also had a few questions involving my particular situation and MGF was very helpful and offered valuable guidance. For most everyone that will be doing this procedure - just follow his outline and you will be fine.

From my experience, here are a couple points that might also help others.

1. I wanted to address the OEM spring rate to better suit my weight, so I ordered a .925kg spring kit from Traxxion Dynamics. To my surprise, the Traxxion spring (270mm) is considerably longer than the OEM spring (235mm). The Traxxion kit comes with a "buffer" to help keep the spring centered and from rubbing against the tube wall. A great concept in theory, but adds extra length to the overall assembly and also jacks with the fluid/air volume ratio inside the fork. The Traxxion kit also comes with a new spacer tube (60mm). The entire Traxxion assembly ended up about 5mm longer than the OEM assembly. This doesn't sound like much - but it really made it extremely difficult to get to the damper rod locknut-to-fork cap assembly. It took all I could do to manhandle everything into position.... and it was not fun. After a couple of emails with Traxxion about how difficult this was - they informed me that they forgot to tell me that to use their kit, you need to remove the "bottom-out" device from the Damper Rod. Well crap...... I did not want to make a permanent modification to my Damper Rod, so I sent the Traxxion kit back.

Traxxion Dynamics kit on the right, OEM on the left:



So now that I realized that I needed to be very specific with aftermarket spring providers - I asked about the length before ordering, lol. I finally found a brand that is a 100% direct replacement for the OEM spring ... K-Tech.

http://store.ktechsuspension.com/front-fork-spring-9-5n-pair-12688.html

I ordered the .95kg K-Tech spring set. Out of curiousity, I set up a ******* spring comparison tool to compare the OEM spring vs the .95kg K-Tech spring:





Herein lies another issue that I have found. Everyone seems to rate their springs differently. Do not assume that "X" brand's .95kg spring is the same as "Y" companie's .95kg spring. Pick a brand, and stick with that brand. Then if you need to change rates, it's easy to know that the spring you actually get will be the expected rate. For anyone that is wondering - the K-Tech .95kg spring is almost darn near equal to the 2010 D675 OEM spring rate. With 70 pounds of weight - the K-Tech spring deflected 1mm less than the OEM 1.02kg spring. lol The difference in these springs, is that the K-Tech is a linear design and the OEM spring has a little bit of progressiveness built in.

For reference, I currently weigh 160 pounds naked / 180 with full riding gear. With the .95kg K-Tech springs, preload backed all the way out, then turned in 1 full revolution, I get 36mm of SAG. According to an email I received from Dan Kyle, you have the correct spring rate when you achieve your desired SAG with the preload adjuster 1/2 way out. So, it appears I'm really close with this .95kg - I'll ride this set-up as-is and determine if I want to add some preload. The linear-rate springs are an "unknown" to me right now so we'll see how it feels as soon as it thaws out here in the midwest, lol.

All-in-all, after coming up with the correct length spring, this is a very easy swap and service. I found a new Race-Tech spring compressor tool on Ebay for cheap, and as MGFChapin advised - I wouldn't do this job without it.
 

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The black rubber thing at the bottom of the outer tube isn't your fork oil seal; it's a dust seal. You should usually replace it when you do the oil seal too, but I'm cheap so I'm going to reuse it. If you have a new one, do whatever you want to get it off short of using a dremel. I gently used a small flathead screwdriver to pry it off, carefully not damaging it.

many thanks for a great DYI instruction!

I am following it now for changing fork seals on a BMW S1000RR, but it will come in handy when I attempt the Striple too.

One thing I cannot do for the moment is to get a screwdriver under the dust seal. It is soft on the inner part, but the outside is solid like it has been glues or something. Is it normal for the dustcup to be so hard? shall I try with a blade, what do you think?
 

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Discussion Starter #209
One thing I cannot do for the moment is to get a screwdriver under the dust seal. It is soft on the inner part, but the outside is solid like it has been glues or something. Is it normal for the dustcup to be so hard? shall I try with a blade, what do you think?
They can harden up over time and be really difficult to get out. It's OK to get a small propane torch to heat up the fork tube. The metal tube will expand while the seal will stay mostly the same size and should be easier to pry out. You can also cut the dust seal on one or two sides.
 

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They can harden up over time and be really difficult to get out. It's OK to get a small propane torch to heat up the fork tube. The metal tube will expand while the seal will stay mostly the same size and should be easier to pry out. You can also cut the dust seal on one or two sides.
aha, I was thinking about heating it with a hair dryer, but decided to cut it. I am struggling with the fork seal now. I guess heating tip applies here as well?
 

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Discussion Starter #211
aha, I was thinking about heating it with a hair dryer, but decided to cut it. I am struggling with the fork seal now. I guess heating tip applies here as well?
A hair dryer probably won't do it. Yes, the torch method will make the oil seal much easier to pry out too.
 

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I am concerned to use open flame on the bike, sorry, it's just me. I have heat gun, it goes up to 550 C.
Do you know who Dave Moss is? If not, he is THE suspension guy. Worldwide. Professional race teams video conference with him, so he can help with suspension set-up. I got the torch idea from him, here he is using one on an Ohlins road & track fork.

 

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Do you know who Dave Moss is? If not, he is THE suspension guy. Worldwide. Professional race teams video conference with him, so he can help with suspension set-up. I got the torch idea from him, here he is using one on an Ohlins road & track fork.

Yeah but Dave has huge ballz when it comes to working on bikes. There are things that he's comfortable doing that I'm not, because I don't have the confidence, and/or experience, and/or skill that he has.

Sent from my HTC6500LVW using Tapatalk
 

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Yeah but Dave has huge ballz when it comes to working on bikes. There are things that he's comfortable doing that I'm not, because I don't have the confidence, and/or experience, and/or skill that he has.
OK, fair enough. Don't do anything you're not comfortable with but I'm no Dave Moss, and I've used this technique successfully many times.
 

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OK, fair enough. Don't do anything you're not comfortable with but I'm no Dave Moss, and I've used this technique successfully many times.
Don't doubt it, and I 've used Dave's method and advice on lots of service stuff (love his videos on tire wear to diagnose suspension issues). I just don't have the stones to use an open flame on anything except shrink tubing.

Sent from my HTC6500LVW using Tapatalk
 

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Torch is fine. However one false move and you will damage your dust cap. Also applied too long and it can damage any plastic pieces internally. I for one prefer a proper heat gun. A lot more control it just takes a bit more patience. It’s also a lot less dangerous around flammable liquids.
 

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Do you know who Dave Moss is? If not, he is THE suspension guy. Worldwide. Professional race teams video conference with him, so he can help with suspension set-up. I got the torch idea from him, here he is using one on an Ohlins road & track fork.

please don't get me wrong, I did not doubt the method, i doubt my abilities :grin2:
 

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My 2014 675R has the FG R&T 43 forks and I checked with Ohlins regarding whether the 150 mm air space should be measured with the spacer in or out. Contrary to what Dave Moss says in his video, Ohlins said that these forks should be measured with the spring and spacer out.

Also, as an alternative to compressing the spring to loosen the jam nut, I modified a spare 17mm wrench (see attached photos) so that I can hold the jam nut with the upper seat (aka spring support) in place as is indicated in the service manual on page 12.19 IMG_1542.jpg

IMG_1546.jpg .

In the interest of full disclosure, I have not yet dismantled the forks so I'm trusting that this should work.
 

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Discussion Starter #220
My 2014 675R has the FG R&T 43 forks and I checked with Ohlins regarding whether the 150 mm air space should be measured with the spacer in or out. Contrary to what Dave Moss says in his video, Ohlins said that these forks should be measured with the spring and spacer out.

Also, as an alternative to compressing the spring to loosen the jam nut, I modified a spare 17mm wrench
You should post this in the R thread: http://www.triumph675.net/forum/showthread.php?t=174098

The air gap isn't set in stone. With the spacer in, there's just a slightly lower volume of oil being put in, so it still must be within Ohlins' range of 150-180mm. I love the way the front feels at 150 with the spacer in per Dave's instructions, so there's nothing wrong with doing it either way.
 
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