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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey everyone,

First time Triumph owner.
Have been riding for about a year and recently upgraded from a Ninja 300 to a '15 Daytona 675.
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive tire

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive lighting

Fell in love with it during the test ride and can see why so many people like em.

Any information on essential/must do's on these things would be welcome.
 

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Nice! That's like going from a moped to a corvette :)

Only essential thing is: Keep rubber side down.

Maintenance wise I would say only 3 things are essential as they are for every motorcycle:

Tires: keep pressure correct and change when wear bars are gone (or after 5-8 years).
Chain: check/adjust proper tension frequently. Replace as required, which should be rarely if tensioned right
Motor: change the oil every year.
 

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Hey everyone,

First time Triumph owner.
Have been riding for about a year and recently upgraded from a Ninja 300 to a '15 Daytona 675.
View attachment 260348
View attachment 260347
Fell in love with it during the test ride and can see why so many people like em.

Any information on essential/must do's on these things would be welcome.
Congrats
Love the Diablo red on the Daytona.

Tell us more about it
Mileage?
Service history?
Any pending issues or repairs?

Take good care of this bike and it will last you a lifetime.
You need to understand that upgrading to a supersport entails upgrading your maintenance schedule as well! You can’t treat this bike like a ninja 300. She needs a bit more care than that.

Major service every 20,000km and simple oil and filter changes in between.

Apart from that some TLC and common sense and you’ll be fine!!


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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice! That's like going from a moped to a corvette :)

Only essential thing is: Keep rubber side down.

Maintenance wise I would say only 3 things are essential as they are for every motorcycle:

Tires: keep pressure correct and change when wear bars are gone (or after 5-8 years).
Chain: check/adjust proper tension frequently. Replace as required, which should be rarely if tensioned right
Motor: change the oil every year.
Certainly can feel the difference 😂

So pretty much the basics then, good to know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Congrats
Love the Diablo red on the Daytona.

Tell us more about it
Mileage?
Service history?
Any pending issues or repairs?

Take good care of this bike and it will last you a lifetime.
You need to understand that upgrading to a supersport entails upgrading your maintenance schedule as well! You can’t treat this bike like a ninja 300. She needs a bit more care than that.

Major service every 20,000km and simple oil and filter changes in between.

Apart from that some TLC and common sense and you’ll be fine!!


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The red looks amazing, i've also been thinking at some point of maybe painting the piece of the frame under the seat white, like how the 675r will have white fairings with the red frame piece.

Mileage is at 17'500km so the 20,000 will be due soon and the last service was done at 15,500.

Bought it with a Two Brothers exhaust system, tail tidy, integrated tail light, has some led's placed behind sone meshing and on the underside of the tail and some swingarm sliders.

It went through a pre-purchase inspection as here in qld, aus you need a RWC (Road Worthy Certificate) to transfer rego. It passed, but after getting it home I found the top two tabs on the front fairing stay have cracked through and were covered in black tape, seller is looking into obtaining a replacement for me after being busted 😅

As I'm still adjusting to the change in power and riding position it'll be getting babied for a while.

Future mods planned are some sliders, flush mount side indicators, a better steering damper, and may look into retrofitting some projectors into some spare headlights.
 

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If you don't find a front subframe in Aus, getting one shipped there will be spendy. Why not just get the one you have repaired? Admittedly I don't know what the 3rd gen subframe looks like, but if it's anything like a 1st/2nd gen then it's cast aluminum and can be repaired with either a tig or aluminum brazing rods. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you don't find a front subframe in Aus, getting one shipped there will be spendy. Why not just get the one you have repaired? Admittedly I don't know what the 3rd gen subframe looks like, but if it's anything like a 1st/2nd gen then it's cast aluminum and can be repaired with either a tig or aluminum brazing rods. Just a thought.
Bicycle tire Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive lighting

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Bicycle part Automotive design

Thats the cracking thats occured, it's on both sides. Got quoted for 50-100 for us-aus shipping depending on size of box.
 

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View attachment 260350
View attachment 260351
Thats the cracking thats occured, it's on both sides. Got quoted for 50-100 for us-aus shipping depending on size of box.
Personally I wouldn’t have that repaired.
I’m sure it can be welded. But that would just burn a hole in my conscience until I replace it. I like my bike to be in perfect condition at all times. But that’s just me.

More importantly, did you figure out how it broke? A broken front fairing stay usually means crash and front impact. Carefully inspect the entire front end for damage. Including suspension and steering head.
And how did you miss it on inspection?? That part is quite visible!


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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Personally I wouldn’t have that repaired.
I’m sure it can be welded. But that would just burn a hole in my conscience until I replace it. I like my bike to be in perfect condition at all times. But that’s just me.

More importantly, did you figure out how it broke? A broken front fairing stay usually means crash and front impact. Carefully inspect the entire front end for damage. Including suspension and steering head.
And how did you miss it on inspection?? That part is quite visible!


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The rest of the bike is in really good nick, not a scratch or mark on it.
My guess would be wheelies, as they seemed to have some good advice on how to do em on this bike, also its the top tabs only and the cracks are identical.

I missed it because it was evening when I checked it and they had black tape over em which blended at the time.
As it is the inspector that did the Roadworthy Certificate also missed it.
 

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The rest of the bike is in really good nick, not a scratch or mark on it.
My guess would be wheelies, as they seemed to have some good advice on how to do em on this bike, also its the top tabs only and the cracks are identical.

I missed it because it was evening when I checked it and they had black tape over em which blended at the time.
As it is the inspector that did the Roadworthy Certificate also missed it.
I can’t see how wheelies would cause that. Not in a million wheelies.

Im sorry I don’t mean to insist that something is wrong with the bike but I’ve learned the hard way not to trust seller’s stories on any kind of damage. They just never seem to have any ounce of honesty and are in for a quick buck. I’ve seen it so many times; people who wreck the front end will just replace the fairing (cockpit etc) and just cheap out on the hidden parts.

In any case you need to remove the entire cockpit assembly to replace that. Hopefully you won’t find any other damage. But be sure to inspect all the mounting points and grommet locations, bolt tabs etc.
Keep us posted.

Also you can probably find a used fairing stay in your area on eBay and save on price and shipping.
Don’t buy cheap Chinese knockoffs as these will break easily and probably won’t be an accurate fit. Tried and tested by yours truly.

Keep us posted.
Happy to answer any questions.


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I can’t see how wheelies would cause that. Not in a million wheelies.

Im sorry I don’t mean to insist that something is wrong with the bike but I’ve learned the hard way not to trust seller’s stories on any kind of damage. They just never seem to have any ounce of honesty and are in for a quick buck. I’ve seen it so many times; people who wreck the front end will just replace the fairing (cockpit etc) and just cheap out on the hidden parts.

In any case you need to remove the entire cockpit assembly to replace that. Hopefully you won’t find any other damage. But be sure to inspect all the mounting points and grommet locations, bolt tabs etc.
Keep us posted.

Also you can probably find a used fairing stay in your area on eBay and save on price and shipping.
Don’t buy cheap Chinese knockoffs as these will break easily and probably won’t be an accurate fit. Tried and tested by yours truly.

Keep us posted.
Happy to answer any questions.


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I understand as you're just trying to help.

From what I can see there isn't any scratches or marks anywhere else on the bike, also the seller is the one shelling out the money to replace it for me 😂

Will go over it again to see if I can find anything, but as I said, last serviced at a dealership 2000ks ago, no marks, passed a RWC inspection (though won't be trusting them in the future), no damage to the forks/handlebars, etc.

I have a quote for a repair, but I'm more thinking of the motoholders replacement.
About the same price as oem, quicker shipping, and seems less brittle than cast pieces.
 

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I understand as you're just trying to help.

From what I can see there isn't any scratches or marks anywhere else on the bike, also the seller is the one shelling out the money to replace it for me

Will go over it again to see if I can find anything, but as I said, last serviced at a dealership 2000ks ago, no marks, passed a RWC inspection (though won't be trusting them in the future), no damage to the forks/handlebars, etc.

I have a quote for a repair, but I'm more thinking of the motoholders replacement.
About the same price as oem, quicker shipping, and seems less brittle than cast pieces.
Haven’t tried or seen these.
Best of luck

Also another piece of advice I give to everyone. If you’re up to it, do your own maintenance. It’s the best way to really get to know your bike and make sure everything is done with the attention it deserves. In the long run you will also save a lot of money you can spend elsewhere. A lot.
If you haven’t done so already, Invest in a decent basic tool kit (Torque wrenches are a must) and a service manual.
Slowly but surely you will add to your tool collection and to your experience, becoming a mini mechanic in no time!


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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Haven’t tried or seen these.
Best of luck

Also another piece of advice I give to everyone. If you’re up to it, do your own maintenance. It’s the best way to really get to know your bike and make sure everything is done with the attention it deserves. In the long run you will also save a lot of money you can spend elsewhere. A lot.
If you haven’t done so already, Invest in a decent basic tool kit (Torque wrenches are a must) and a service manual.
Slowly but surely you will add to your tool collection and to your experience, becoming a mini mechanic in no time!


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Appreciate the advice mate, have a few basic tool kits around the shed, need to get myself a torque wrench though.
Will be trusting the trained mechanocs for the major services though.
 

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Landing a wheelie hard can definitely cause that sort of damage. It's either that or a repairable write-off. Did you check the WOVR?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Landing a wheelie hard can definitely cause that sort of damage. It's either that or a repairable write-off. Did you check the WOVR?
Yea did a PPSR check, no WOVR or stolen history.
He seemed to be very confident about his wheelie advice for this specific bike and reckons the cast aluminium fairing stay is a weak point.
As it is he is replacing it for me.
 

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I've done at least a dozen of these on various bikes and while it takes a couple hours no special skills are required to swap one out. Even a minor impact can break them, especially if they are over tightened at the mounting point.

Gixxers are notorious for breaking these fairing stays. One I fixed allegedly happened while the bike was just on a moving truck from TX to GA.

There are many complaints about these breaking on the current gen Yamaha R1. Yes, even just on hard wheelie put downs.

Every manufacturer seems to be making components lighter and lighter to wring out every ounce of performance but durability suffers.
 

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I have a motoholders on my track bike, and yes they can be straightened, but it's not particularly easy to straighten them so that everything lines up perfect. Last time I straightened mine it was over an hour of screwing around with it to get it perfect. That said, I would definitely rather spend an hour straightening one than spend $300 replacing it.
 
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