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Discussion Starter #1
My 2007 Daytona is about to become a dedicated track bike!

I've been wanting to make this move for a long time, and now that I have my eye on a new street bike (white 2008 Ducati 848) I want to convert the Triumph into a track machine. I've been mining the forums for information but would welcome any advice, words of wisdom, referrals to experts/techs/shops, or invidious cracks of envy that you fine people could offer up. I've enjoyed a few track days in the past, but never had the luxury of a dedicated machine and want to make this the best experience possible!
 

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If you already have a couple of track days under your belt, I'd highly recommend going to a racing school like California Superbike School, Freddie Spencer's school, etc. (There are plenty to choose from.) Prices range from a couple of hundred to a couple thousand; it depends on student to teacher ratio and whether you are using their bike and gear or your own.

Most new track riders make the mistake of spending lots of money on their bike instead of their riding skill, not realizing that they're wasting money on all the go-fast parts because they have no idea how to really ride fast to begin with. Be assured: riding skill will trump any upgrade you make to your bike.

The single best thing for your bike will probably be a set of race tires. I've been using Dunlops and like them.

Beyond that, I suggest you start with handling upgrades like suspension or brakes, then go for power last. You want to make sure that both you and the chassis can handle higher speeds before you go upgrading the engine.
 

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WW,

Todd675 sums it up well.

Also, begin your track experience at your pace with an open mind and don't feel pressured to go as fast or faster than anybody else.

Trick and expensive bits are excellent for those who have advanced to a level that can appreciate them. But riding skills, and subsequently your comfort level and confidence on the track, will usually give you more bang for the buck early on.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Most new track riders make the mistake of spending lots of money on their bike instead of their riding skill, not realizing that they're wasting money on all the go-fast parts because they have no idea how to really ride fast to begin with. Be assured: riding skill will trump any upgrade you make to your bike.
Thanks, Todd....the only money I'm putting into the bike right now is for race plastics, safety wiring, and (if I have to time) getting the suspension/frame measured. There's a track day up at Mid Ohio in a couple weeks, and I'd like to burn through a set of tires!

The schools have always looked like a great learning experience to me...would I gain more from taking a class on my OWN bike?? Or, is it worth going to a school that supplies the motorcycle so I don't have to scuff up my own??
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Avoid the U.K. made Dunlop GP209 and GP211 NTec (at least avoid the made in U.K. front tire). They tend to grow at speed to the point where they rip up the front fender.
Haha...thanks Counsel. I ran Dunlops on my R6 (the last bike I had at the track) and I really didn't like those things-ended up switching to Michelins. Now that I'm on the Daytona, the Pirellis have really grown on me...
 

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Yeh counsel.
had the same problem with front guard:thumbup:. Loved the feel of dunlops though. have just changed to racetec slicks(as sponser is now paying) 1st race tommorrow.:thumbsup::thumbsup:
Would agree with attending a race school & not spending too much money too soon. these are an awesome machine and you can achieve heaps with stock componants.:coolgleamA:
ENJOY
 

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I'd make sure to get the suspension dialed in first. Have a reputable tuner set it up for you. Drop a little coin on a new rear shock since the stocker isn't really up to the task for serious track duty.

Stock brakes are awesome. I've raced with the stock pads and turned 34's and 35's at Mid-Ohio with them. I now run Vesrah RJLs.

When you have time/money, i'd add some Woodcraft clip-ons, rearsets, and caseguards for safety and convenience. The GSG-moto frame sliders are really nice and hold up well.

An aftermarket steering damper helps. Again, the stocker isn't really up to the task. I have a Pit-Bull and like it.

When it's time to do some gearing changes, do the 520 conversion and grab a few different rear sprockets.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
An aftermarket steering damper helps. Again, the stocker isn't really up to the task. I have a Pit-Bull and like it.
Thanks, mook.... Does anyone have any data on wether a unit similar to the stock "shock" type damper or one more like the Put Bull, or GPR, or Scotts type stabilizer is more effective??

Also...on the subject of rearsets...does anyone have any feedback on LSL or Sato rearsets???
 

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Relative track day noob

This is my second season of track days. Here is a list of my current mods:

Pit Bull steering damper
Woodcraft rear sets
Woodcraft clip ons
Catalyst Composites bodywork
Puig Windscreen
Stomp grip (makes a big difference and is cheap!)
XT lap timer.

With the help of friends, I set the sag and have the stock suspension pretty dialed in. I started with the base settings and used this link as a guide http://www.sportrider.com/tech/motorcycle_suspension/index.html Keep notes and you'll have a comfortable set up in little time.

I ride "B" group and the bike is plenty fast and handles beautifully. Setting the sag was REALLY important. I'm spending my extra money on tires at the moment. I run Pirelli DOT race tires (DC IIIs), that don't require warmers. The heat up quickly and last 3-5 track days.

My next upgrades will be new front fork internals and a better rear shock. At my ability level, I'm in no rush to make the changes. This bike really is pretty awesome right out of the box. Take the time to set it up properly and it will treat you well.
 

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I've run into few people who've tried it, but you can modify your shock internals just like you can the forks. I did just that on my RC51 with excellent results. I RaceTech'd both of them, and for about a quarter of the price (I did the install myself) got a great set of forks and shock as a result. It may be worth doing if you're on a budget. I've only RaceTech'd the forks on my 675 so far, but plan to do the shock this summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've only RaceTech'd the forks on my 675 so far, but plan to do the shock this summer.
Todd,

When you redid your forks on the 675, did you purchase the full cartridge kit from RaceTech or did you just replace some valving and/or springs??
 

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Here's what I would do in this order:

1.Stock suspenion adjusted by professional
2.Race plastics/Zero Gravity Windscreen/Stomp Grips
3.Clip-ons, Rearsets, Woodcraft Left Side Stator Cover, Right Side Case cover, GSG or Woodcraft Sliders + Spare bars for the clip-ons and spare pegs for the rearsets.
4.Replace Steering Damper with a good one
5.Slipper Clutch
6.New Rear Shock/20mm valve kit on front/Get suspension readjusted by professional.
7.Full Exhaust/Filter/Powercommander
8.Quickshifter
9. Do lots more track days
10. Safety wire bike and get racing license
 

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Todd,

When you redid your forks on the 675, did you purchase the full cartridge kit from RaceTech or did you just replace some valving and/or springs??
I replaced all valving and springs, not the cartridge kit. The cartridge kit is pretty new and wasn't available last summer when I bought the Gold Valves.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I replaced all valving and springs, not the cartridge kit. The cartridge kit is pretty new and wasn't available last summer when I bought the Gold Valves.
Thanks! When I went to the RaceTech page and did the spring calculations the front wasn't off by too much but the rear calculations were MASSIVELY different than stock (from 12.6 kg/mm down to 7.7 kg/mm--I weigh around 155). I know RaceTech has their act together, but I didn't expect a difference like that!
 

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The stock shock has a very stiff spring which is surprising since it seems most stock shocks are too soft, especially for racing/track applications. Race Tech recommends a slightly heavier spring for my body weight (210), but I'll stick with the stock spring and throw a gold valve in it.
 
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