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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did some smart stuff and put a big gash in my coolant hose down by the front sprocket. It happened at the track, so I ran to O'Reilly's and patched it with a steel barb and continued riding. The replacement hose finally showed up and it looks like I even ordered the right one.

However. I'm worried. I'm not exactly the brightest spoon in the shed when it comes to bike/car repair. The top end of the hose seems to just disappear into a dark hole. Is this going to be one of those things I get halfway into and just have to give up on motorcycles? If anyone knows roughly what's involved, I'm all ears.
Here's the hose:
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custommm patch (don't mind those crashy marks. that was the last owner):
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And yeah, where's that thing going to?
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The hose goes to the top of the head. It's a bit of a fiddly job but you don't need to be a mechanic to do it. You will need to remove the tank and have some basic tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The hose goes to the top of the head. It's a bit of a fiddly job but you don't need to be a mechanic to do it. You will need to remove the tank and have some basic tools.
Oh good. I can remove the tank and I do have some basic tools. Hopefully an afternoon is enough time. I'll report back
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Success. I did take the gas tank off, but didn't end up using that as an access point. It was helpful just to get light on the top of the hose through.

For reference:
I was replacing this bypass coolant hose: T2100408
The bottom of the hose was behind the front sprocket cover (already removed). I unclipped that end of the hose and let the coolant pour into a bin underneath.
Next I removed little triangular part of the fairing on the opposite side of the bike, nearish the tank (tank already removed for visibility).
I reached my tiny lady hand all the way in there and awkwardly unclipped the top end of the hose (see photo).
I DID NOT remove the hose at this point.
I took the hose clamp completely off the top of the old hose and clipped it onto the top of the new hose, and slid it up about an inch.
I duct taped the top of the old hose to the bottom of the new hose (see photo w/ red duct tape).
I went back to the shifter-side of the bike and slowly pulled the the old hose out, which threaded the new hose in place.
I moved the clamp from the bottom end of the old hose onto the bottom end of the new hose and reattached it.
I went back over to the throttle-side of the bike, reached my hand back in that opening, and pushed the top of the new hose onto the nipple.
The top of the new hose already had the clip on it, cause of my excellent foresight, so I just slid the clip into place.

Lastly I had to take the entire throttle-side fairing off and figure out how to access the top of the radiator to top off the lost coolant :rolleyes:
I used a mix of distilled water + water wetter on the stern advice of the racetrack workers after I spilled antifreeze on track.

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I'm impressed. Well done.
It looks like there are a couple of bolts missing from the top of the clutch cover. Or did you remove them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm impressed. Well done.
It looks like there are a couple of bolts missing from the top of the clutch cover. Or did you remove them?
Thanks! I'm tryin. That was a little bracket for the fairing. Here's a picture of it before I took it off. I kinda absent-mindedly removed it, but it's probably not good to run the bike with the clutch cover missing bolts. Oops. This took me a couple hours but I feel like it'll take me another evening to reassemble the 100-peice puzzle of all the fairing parts I removed.


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If you're taking your bike to the track then you might want to consider some case savers for crash protection. It will save you a lot of heartache instead of grinding a hole through the covers. GB Racing have a good range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you're taking your bike to the track then you might want to consider some case savers for crash protection. It will save you a lot of heartache instead of grinding a hole through the covers. GB Racing have a good range.
Whhhhyyy would you think I would need those? :D
jk. I just ordered some. I feel like now I'm going to crash this weekend before they arrive.
 

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Well done. I'm surprised they didn't check to see if you were running coolant before letting you on track. Or in the very least ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I’m surprised by a lot of things they don’t check before sending me out on track
 

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If you're not going to run a sprocket cover then it's a good idea to cable tie that hose to the kickstand wiring or the coolant overflow hose.

Our track day organizers don't require glycol free bikes. After all a lot of them are street bikes.
 
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