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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to check my maintenance long to get exact mileage, I know it's been less than 6,000miles.

2012 675R 30,000miles

Did my Forkseals back in August/September of 2019. A reputable Shop did them on the bike took around 2hrs. A year later this past August I went back to the same shop for service, after all my repairs their pointed on the Forkseals leaking.

Surprising to me is how bad they are leaking and 2 how soon they failed.

In the shops defense
1) I have been practicing my wheelies. Only came down hard once. Overall they are glorified clutch ups. (Get the front wheel off the ground then chase it with 100% throttle to stay up longer) lol!
2) I work with Hydraulics a little, I wonder if my tubes maybe bent causing the seals to fail that fast. Even after a rebuild if the cylinder is bent it will cause uneven wear and the seal will fail sooner.
3) I can not find any site or machine that allows you to service Forkseals on the bike. So I am getting in my head about it. Every shop i called has said they need to pull them off the bike.

In short, I'm asking is it reliably possible to serviced the front fork seals with the front forks still on the bike?
 

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In short, I'm asking is it reliably possible to serviced the front fork seals with the front forks still on the bike?
No. I'd say impossible, but then somebody would claim to have done it.

But taking the forks off is really not too big a deal (providing you have a way to hold the front end up while they're off).

Fork seals should not fail that quickly, wheelies or not. I've had 10 year old bikes with the original seals.

Get a Sealmate and cross your fingers. This has fixed minor seeping for me several times. If it fixes it you'd still want to add fluid since it sounds like you lost a good amount. That you can do with the forks on the bike.
 

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30k miles could be a lot on fork tubes, depending on what sort of debris/road grime they're subjected too. Check the finish closely; if they're pitted, the seals will go back in a weekend. A bent tube could also do it. I wouldn't blame the shop even a little. I typically guarantee my work for the first race weekend or few hundred miles, but after that they're on their own.

As above, you can use a Sealmate to try and clean them in place, or you can also use photo film to get between the seal & fork leg and try to clean any gunk out. No other way to service them except to remove the forks.
 

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Could also be the quality of parts used. I put AllsBalls (or whatever they're called) seals in once and never again. My forks leaked within a year as well. Replaced them with factory seals and no issue in 2 years.
 

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Could also be the quality of parts used. I put AllsBalls (or whatever they're called) seals in once and never again. My forks leaked within a year as well. Replaced them with factory seals and no issue in 2 years.
Good point. All Balls and Leak Proof are the worst I've seen. I've had good luck with OEM, SKF, K-Tech & Race Tech seals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No. I'd say impossible, but then somebody would claim to have done it.

But taking the forks off is really not too big a deal (providing you have a way to hold the front end up while they're off).

Fork seals should not fail that quickly, wheelies or not. I've had 10 year old bikes with the original seals.

Get a Sealmate and cross your fingers. This has fixed minor seeping for me several times. If it fixes it you'd still want to add fluid since it sounds like you lost a good amount. That you can do with the forks on the bike.
I did not doubt they could replace Forkseals on the bike until I could not find any machines,tools or even how-to's. So I figured I asked the forums.

Sadly already got the seal cleaner tool and they are still leaking the same as before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
30k miles could be a lot on fork tubes, depending on what sort of debris/road grime they're subjected too. Check the finish closely; if they're pitted, the seals will go back in a weekend. A bent tube could also do it. I wouldn't blame the shop even a little. I typically guarantee my work for the first race weekend or few hundred miles, but after that they're on their own.

As above, you can use a Sealmate to try and clean them in place, or you can also use photo film to get between the seal & fork leg and try to clean any gunk out. No other way to service them except to remove the forks.
Thanks, I will check them again. I am almost certain they are smooth. I do keep up with my bike and keep her clean so that nothing surprises me. That it why I am so shocked that my forkseals blew out like that. Last time they seeped now they are raining down onto my brakes.

I did not blame the shop at all, let them know about my wheelies even had one of their techs wheelie my bike. ( I think my clutches were going out) To me it's easier and faster to fix a vehicle when the customer is honest about what they have done.

I am curious then, if they are not servicing my forkseals are they charging me $400 to use a sealmate? I would be really upset if I take it to another shop and they tell me I have OEM forkseals still in the tube.
Could also be the quality of parts used. I put AllsBalls (or whatever they're called) seals in once and never again. My forks leaked within a year as well. Replaced them with factory seals and no issue in 2 years.
That's a good point, didn't think about that
 

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I am curious then, if they are not servicing my forkseals are they charging me $400 to use a sealmate? I would be really upset if I take it to another shop and they tell me I have OEM forkseals still in the tube.
It's easy to see if the seals are OEM, but that doesn't necessarily mean they're the original old ones, does it? No way the shop you went to could've used new OEM seals?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's easy to see if the seals are OEM, but that doesn't necessarily mean they're the original old ones, does it? No way the shop you went to could've used new OEM seals?
I am not sure on Forkseals I have never done them. But some parts you can tell are OEM and/or have never been replaced. Like sparkplug wires, they only come numbered from factory, not saying you can not find number sparkplug wires.

But this not an "Attack The Shop" thread.
I wanted to know how Forkseals are done without taking the forks off the bike. I was genuinely curious to know if there was a machine to allow that
 

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Right off the hop you said a reputable shop did the work... If it's reputable, then they're not gonna risk their hard work and good rep to defraud you for a few dollars. The bike community is fiercely loyal and u l forgiving unlike shit car mechanics.

Check your tubes for obvious pitting, anything you can feel with your fingernail is a problem. The plating should be butter smooth. As for bent lowers, I'd like to say not likely... There would be so much stiction in the forks you really should be able to tell, aside of the fact that the reputable shop would have noticed that and advised you.

Ive used all balls seals in the past and hasn't really been an issue that I recall. You should be servicing your forks and shock every couple years anyaways, and it's really only the added cost of the seals themselves (so what, $30) to replace them while the forks are being serviced and are disassembled already.

Anything more than a few years without replacing the oil and cleaning the suspension internals and you wouldn't believe the amount of performance degradation that's occurring. The oil does contaminate and absorb moisture over time. Then again, most folks don't even bother to flush and replace their brake fluid either... So I guess it really comes down to pride of ownership and what you expect out of your bike. Personally, if I'm riding a sport bike, the whole point is performance, so I treat and maintain it as such.

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I need to check my maintenance long to get exact mileage, I know it's been less than 6,000miles.

2012 675R 30,000miles

Did my Forkseals back in August/September of 2019. A reputable Shop did them on the bike took around 2hrs. A year later this past August I went back to the same shop for service, after all my repairs their pointed on the Forkseals leaking.

Surprising to me is how bad they are leaking and 2 how soon they failed.

In the shops defense
1) I have been practicing my wheelies. Only came down hard once. Overall they are glorified clutch ups. (Get the front wheel off the ground then chase it with 100% throttle to stay up longer) lol!
2) I work with Hydraulics a little, I wonder if my tubes maybe bent causing the seals to fail that fast. Even after a rebuild if the cylinder is bent it will cause uneven wear and the seal will fail sooner.
3) I can not find any site or machine that allows you to service Forkseals on the bike. So I am getting in my head about it. Every shop i called has said they need to pull them off the bike.

In short, I'm asking is it reliably possible to serviced the front fork seals with the front forks still on the bike?
They probably just slipped a piece of plastic under the seals to clean them. The forks need to come off to replace the seals. It not a 2 hrs job
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Right off the hop you said a reputable shop did the work... If it's reputable, then they're not gonna risk their hard work and good rep to defraud you for a few dollars. The bike community is fiercely loyal and u l forgiving unlike shit car mechanics.

Check your tubes for obvious pitting, anything you can feel with your fingernail is a problem. The plating should be butter smooth. As for bent lowers, I'd like to say not likely... There would be so much stiction in the forks you really should be able to tell, aside of the fact that the reputable shop would have noticed that and advised you.

Ive used all balls seals in the past and hasn't really been an issue that I recall. You should be servicing your forks and shock every couple years anyaways, and it's really only the added cost of the seals themselves (so what, $30) to replace them while the forks are being serviced and are disassembled already.

Anything more than a few years without replacing the oil and cleaning the suspension internals and you wouldn't believe the amount of performance degradation that's occurring. The oil does contaminate and absorb moisture over time. Then again, most folks don't even bother to flush and replace their brake fluid either... So I guess it really comes down to pride of ownership and what you expect out of your bike. Personally, if I'm riding a sport bike, the whole point is performance, so I treat and maintain it as such.

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I did say they were a reputable shop, they are a sponsor on our local bike forums. They have been sponsors on the forums for years. But like good restuarants changing chefs, shops change mechanincs a so does their quality.
I am not personally attacking you, just correcting some misinformation before it spreads.

The bike community....well.... you have to be cautious around the bike community just like any other community. There are good people in the bike communtiy that will help anyone and there are others who take advantage of this kindness. Bike theifs are in the bike community, I have met a few of them. Also I have stopped by a bike shop and talked to riders who were sold " Frankenstein bikes" Suzuki GSXR 1000 with 600cc parts, Yamaha R1's with GSXR 600cc parts but told they were bone stock. Or wrecked bikes with brand new plastics and engine covers , oh and I can't forget about the swapped instruments clusters with lower miles. A freind of ours had his bike stolen, I lead him to a shop that buys salvage/wrecked bikes and rebuilds them. In short 2 mechanics there knew something but stayed quite. We got closure and since moved on. Just becareful out there, if there is chance some extra money under the table could be made...it will be.
Lastly a mechanic is a mechanic, Car , bike, Hyrdraulic, Heavy line, off Road , etc they are not too much different from each other. They are all problem solvers. There are a lot of variables that go into why customers think they are being ripped off but It's a lot for me to type and I don't think you will read it all. Mechanics lie and don't know what they are doing, so they slap parts on a vehicle until it's fixed costing customers a lot of money. They are called "parts slappers". The Good mechanics do not considered them real mechanincs. Customers lie as well, and cost themselves more money by lying. Ask any diesel mechanic, out of the many customers who have put the wrong fuel in their diesel vehicle how many or what percentage was honest about it lol!

Again I am NOT personally attacking you, just correcting some things. It seems like negative things are quick to spread like wild fire on the internet. I once heard "Why believe the truth when the lie is far more entertaining"

In closing with my bike, I has been taken to another shop. They have concluded that the previous shop who changed my forkseals on my bike just cleaned my old seals and put on new dust caps. I am not upset, I do not hate the shop, I know and trust things will work out in then end like they always have for me. That's all I want to say about this, and do NOT want to spread negativity across this forum. I like it here it is a positive site.

/Thread
 

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Super sorry to hear the original shop ripped you off. Super not ok! I'd head back and give then one chance to do right by you (refund) or you post your experience in the community/FB/lical forums/etc.

If you don't, then it's a learned behaviour and chances are they'll do it more and more to more and more other customers.

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LOL, cleaned the fork seals and just put new dust caps? That requires complete disassembly of the forks and the dust caps are almost the same price as the seals o_O


Shit fails, they worked for over a year, dust/grit from the road wears them, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Super sorry to hear the original shop ripped you off. Super not ok! I'd head back and give then one chance to do right by you (refund) or you post your experience in the community/FB/lical forums/etc.

If you don't, then it's a learned behaviour and chances are they'll do it more and more to more and more other customers.

Sent from my SM-N960W using Tapatalk
Thanks man, trust me it will all work out in the end. No need for me to waist my time and energy into this. I will not get the results I desire. I am a confrontational person and that won't end well, and online post can be edited or deleted. Also I don't know which tech did the work, so I could blame the owner and throw their company through the mud but for what? That tech could have been fired, the owner could play dumb. And I would be hurting the other people that work for that company who had nothing to do with it.

"Short term gains can have long term consequences "
you are right I wasn't the only rider, things will balance themselves out, they always do.

The good in this I was able to catch up with old riders who I haven't talked to in years. I was surprised that I still had their numbers and that they still worked lol!
LOL, cleaned the fork seals and just put new dust caps? That requires complete disassembly of the forks and the dust caps are almost the same price as the seals o_O


Shit fails, they worked for over a year, dust/grit from the road wears them, etc.
Lol! Hey hey hey don't forget my glorified clutch ups. I looked into it because I had a weird feeling about my last experience with them which was a 1st after knowing them since 2011. While asking other riders about Forkseals being done on the bike and asking who they trust to do them. This reputable shop came up a few times in conversation for doing less than quality work and no doing right by the customer.

I have yet to find any type of device that allows Forkseals to be done on the bike. 2 shops laughed and asked if they flipped my bike. Both Triumph dealers said 1.5hr per fork at $100/hr and $150 in parts. Every shop said about $150 for parts. And 1.5hr- 2hrs per fork their labor rate varieds. One Shop declined because they were ohlins and said they were not certified to work on Ohlins. They would just send them out.

The production date on my bike is February 2012, new oil seals don't harden after a year.
 

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The duration of a set of fork seals is not something set on stone; you're not riding in a clean chamber free of debris, dust and what not. Seals drying up is only one of many reasons why fork seals fail, they could've been damaged during install, debris could've got in there, oil level / weight might have been incorrect, you might have landed a wheelie too hard, etc.

How did the other shop date the fork seals to determine they were the old ones? It just doesn't add up. The dust seal is the last part to come off the fork during disassembly and the first one to be installed during assembly; to replace the dust seal everything had to come apart. Is it possible to do it on two hours? Yeah, its not that hard. Not replacing the oil seals would have saved them no time at all, labor is more expensive than the parts. To me it just seems that the new shop is slandering the other shop to try to win a new customer.
 
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