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So my story and questions go something like this:

LONG RAMBLING...GO TO LAST PARAGRAPH FOR SHORT VERSION. THX!

graduated from a local City University of New York (CUNY) college with a triple major in accounting, finance, and economics. Yeah lets just say I was the last person to do that after figuring out alot of the classes in the curriculum overlapped and I was able to get the triple for a total of 140 credits. The dean didn't like this very much and flipped the script on the whole business department and their classes.

anyways, While in my auditing class I heard about fraud cases, Barry Minkow of ZZZZ Best Carpet Cleaning really intrigued me as to how he did what he did. I was able to land a job at a mid-size CPA firm in New Jersey and interned for a tax season, and then worked full time until the end of the next tax season. On April 14, 2009 they laid me off along with a few others, blaming economic troubles but I understood that they have seen I really wasn't into it.

The work consisted of audits that were commissioned by the clients themselves in order to get funding or satisfy disclosure agreements. I also filed all types of federal returns. 990s suck.

After being laid off for a year and not really being motivated to go back into public accounting, I applied for a city tax auditor for NYC Dept. of Finance. The past 8 months I was working in a personal income unit that would target earners of at least 1 million a year if they owned an apartment in NYC but claimed to live outside and avoid NYC tax of 4.75%. I thoroughly enjoyed the investigative side of the job, but it was very tedious and consisted of going through credit card records, telephone records (LUDs), and anything else that can prove where the person might have been in the year. 183 days without any NYC activity is needed to proven by the taxpayer. not an easy feat on their end and the city usually wins.

I got so fed up with the mundane task of going through hundreds of pages of call records that i had my dad program a simple extractor that would convert it into excel format and then have it record the first and last call of each day, which was the main goal.

I got a pat on the back for changing a task that usually would take 1-2 weeks into 10-15 minutes.

There was a posting for Office of tax enforcement seeking my title auditors. I had been applying to federal positions as well as state for investigative work and this was perfect.

This has been my first week here and besides the usual city worker grumnblings the atmosphere is much more relaxed and less administrative. its more about the big picture which is quite refreshing. We got news today that we will be placed under the Sheriff's office now and it will be even more so law enforcement oriented rather than tax policy. The NYC Sheriff is "http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dailypolitics/2010/12/theres-a-new-sheriff-in-town.html that dude. he seems pretty serious and ready to make our office the premier tax enforcement unit in the country. Quite a bold claim.

anyways, long rambling cut short, for which I do apologize, what kind of future could I see if I wish to advance my career into a more investigative agent role such as with the FBI? Does my experience as an auditor working besides investigators outweigh someone with actual field law enforcement experience?
 

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I'd say that's all largely dependent on the role you would be going for within the FBI, though I think your skills and experience might be better appreciated by the Secret Service. They actually have jurisdiction over a number of financial crimes, identity theft, etc... Don't forget about them when hoping to make the most of your auditing and investigative experience.
 
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