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I found a used 2017 Daytona 675r with 625 miles. Has an Arrow can, Triumph tuned ECU, and a RK 520 +2, -1 sprocket kit. It was purely a track bike except a few times on the Dragon.

I know there's a lot of back and forth about how to properly break in a bike, but it seems this one was most definitely on the extreme break-in side of things.

Anything I should be on the lookout for?
 

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I found a used 2017 Daytona 675r with 625 miles. Has an Arrow can, Triumph tuned ECU, and a RK 520 +2, -1 sprocket kit. It was purely a track bike except a few times on the Dragon.

I know there's a lot of back and forth about how to properly break in a bike, but it seems this one was most definitely on the extreme break-in side of things.

Anything I should be on the lookout for?
Personally I wouldn’t touch that bike with a 10 foot pole.
Brand new engines need a break in. Period. It’s pure physics of friction and tolerances. It’s not a matter of opinion.

This bike has not been on the extreme side of a break in because it has probably never seen a break in.


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Personally I wouldn’t touch that bike with a 10 foot pole.
Brand new engines need a break in. Period. It’s pure physics of friction and tolerances. It’s not a matter of opinion.
True to an extent, but becoming less so with modern precise manufacturing technologies and lubricants.

Within the last couple years Cycle World took the same new bike and broke one motor in per mfg. recommendation and another ignoring all common sense. They then took the motors apart and had a lab measure ring wear, compression etc.

There was no measurable difference. This may be on Youtube as well. Ari Henning was the author.

If the price were right and it passed my test drive I'd buy that bike in a minute.
 

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I've broken a few brand new motors in at the track. My experience with race/track bikes is that most owners over service their bikes, unlike a lot of road users.
 

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Racing and race starts cause wear. Riders who only do track days are comparatively slow and won't do the bike any harm. He was varying RPM a lot by doing track days, so in my book the bike was broken in properly. Don't be afraid, buy it if the price is right.
 

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I'm not an engine builder by any means. I just turn wrenches for a living on gasoline, diesel and on bikes we own.

I too have seen an article on another forum basically saying that driving a new engine safe and easy is not the right way to break in an engine. It's best to keep the engine load light but heavy on the engine braking to seat the piston rings.

Also I had a fellow rider/track day instructor years ago who bought a brand new R6 off the showroom floor, put race plastics on it and took it to the track to break the engine in. He rode in the Intermediate level 2 class all day. Took and oil sample and had it sent out and drop the oil pan himself. No issues with the engine for a year. I only say a year because I got out of riding. I can reach out to him if you want ?

With this all being said I would take an oil sample now and ride it for a 100miles and take another sample (just incase the previous own just changed the oil). Pull the oil pan pull a bearing cap after getting torque specs and see how it's wearing. Every engine has one that wears more than the rest do to how the engine gets oil, also depending wear most of the engine heat is. Commonly I have seen builders say it's usually the one closest to the transmission. But that's on car engines, I don't know about motorcycles.

Next I would check my camshaft lobes and see how they are wearing after pulling off my valve cover gaskets. Check my cam gears as well.

But before all this I would check compression. They should be even on all cylinders if it's a newly rebuilt engine. The general rule is I think ..is each cylinder needs to be within 10% of each other. I personally like to see at least 100psi on each cylinder. As far as variances it depends on the mileage. But I always check specification on our online repair software. For me personally I would want to see 1-3psi difference on each cylinder . That I can be ok with.

I hope this helps you, let us know what you find decide with the bike. I work on diesel now, so the last time I checked compression was 2 years ago when my dad bought and ebay starter that rotated the engine the wrong way lol! And back when I worked on gasoline vehicles. We opened them up enough to find the issue and had them sent out for rebuilding.
 

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Next I would check my camshaft lobes and see how they are wearing after pulling off my valve cover gaskets. Check my cam gears as well.
I have rebuilt four of these engine and cam lobes are not a common source of wear. What does wear are the cam journals, wrist pins, valves and guides.

But before all this I would check compression.
The pistons in these engines are forged and pretty durable as well as the rings.

I would never buy one of these bikes without popping the valve cover off and removing the cam ladder which will give you an indication of the abuse level of the engine in question.
 
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