Kung Fu grip? Or not? - Page 2 - Triumph675.Net Forums
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post #11 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 11:21
IanC
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While commuting I would focus on making sure I was using my core. After a while that helped a lot and became natural. I would still find myself gripping tighter than I should and changing the rear sets and adjusting my peg position helped a lot with that. In my current riding position it's much more natural for me to ride loose.

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post #12 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 11:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_E_D View Post
When I'm pushing hard enough to be sliding front and rear, my grip on the bars mid corner is fingertip light. A cup would fall out of my hands. once any slide is managed, grip tightens a little as I hold on against acceleration forces, and need to bring myself back up to the seat.
This is something that I had to figure out on my own and I wish someone mentioned it to me earlier. Even at TTD it was never mentioned, it was always just stay loose but nothing more specific then that. After figuring out that grip tightness changes constantly it makes things a lot easier, rather then just thinking its one "setting" and thats it.

No matter what though if you get off the bike and your hands are tired after a 15-20 min session your grip is way too tight. What I personally found is the the lower I keep my head, the less I feel like I need to hold on to the bars, your body is closer to the bike and turning forces dont feel as strong in that position.
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post #13 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 12:45 Thread Starter
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At what point, will the bike track the curve - until you gas it back into upright position?

In other words, I'm setting up for the turn, tipping in with a counter steer, when should my grip get all loose so the wheels and suspension can do their thing?
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post #14 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 13:03
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The bike always wants to go back upright due to gyroscopic forces from the wheel. Just less so when it's leaned over. It will never just track the turn on it's own. Your grip should never be tight.
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post #15 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 13:03
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finnzilla View Post
At what point, will the bike track the curve - until you gas it back into upright position?

In other words, I'm setting up for the turn, tipping in with a counter steer, when should my grip get all loose so the wheels and suspension can do their thing?
The bike always wants to go straight (centrifugal force). It's the weight of the rider which makes the bike turn.

BTW, the grip pressure I use is the same as I was taught in my other hobby, golf - hold the club (grip) as if you were holding a small bird that you didn't want to escape.

When I'm riding (balanced) well, I can use just fingertips 99% of the time.

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post #16 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 13:38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finnzilla View Post
At what point, will the bike track the curve - until you gas it back into upright position?

In other words, I'm setting up for the turn, tipping in with a counter steer, when should my grip get all loose so the wheels and suspension can do their thing?
As soon as your countersteer input is done, you want to relax any pressure on the bars. Your body hanging off and the right amount of throttle should hold the bike in a carving turn until you gas it hard enough to stand it up.

It's a little counter intuitive, but when you first crack the gas from zero to maintenance throttle, the bike will hook and carve a little tighter if you are relaxed enough. This is due to the weight transfering back and the front "self steering" taking effect. It takes quite a bit of throttle to actually stand the bike up.

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post #17 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 13:44
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But now we are getting too detailed. The reason that we say ride with loose arms as a general instruction is because physical skills are learned from gross to fine. If I talked people through every detail, they would be more messed up than before getting the info. The finer details may actually be different from rider to rider. It's best not to think about it at that level until you are actually able to observe and analyze your own rider actions.

Even debating the physics of this can be a distractor. Tip it in and get loose on the bars. refine your actions after you have the basics.

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post #18 of 29 Old 02-02-16, 17:20 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_E_D View Post
Tip it in and get loose on the bars. refine your actions after you have the basics.
Thanks for those sage words
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post #19 of 29 Old 02-04-16, 00:07
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No doubt, me included, hehe. I, myself, is still a work in progress. It's a "practice until you don't think about it". Kinda like blipping throttle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_E_D View Post
OK, but if anyone tells you that they never grip harder than that, they are lying. It is more like a process in which you remember to release tension generated in braking and during tip in by the time you reach max lean. At that point you do want the bars loose in your hands.

Why such a light touch? so the front wheel can steer itself! after tip in, motorcycles are self steering vehicles. The front wheel tracks an arc based on your speed (momentum and throttle input). If the back end slides, the front end corrects it by countersteering into the slide.
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post #20 of 29 Old 02-04-16, 13:34
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I've always heard the "holding a bird" analogy as well. Another one that really works is resting a finger or two on the levers, middle finger works best for most, but it is a personal pref for sure. This will prevent a death grip and train good muscle memory. This may not work for all on the track but street practice should instill proper grip to be carried over. It is indeed true that grip pressure varies under different conditions, especially hard braking.

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