FAQ for new riders: please add to it! - Page 5 - Triumph675.Net Forums
General 675 discussion Anything related to the Triumph 675 model(s), and miscellaneous motorcycle talk.

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post #41 of 103 Old 04-10-08, 11:12
Juggz675
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j2theoshgosh

Wow, that post needs some bullet points .

Something else not mentioned:
When changing lanes NEVER...NEVER trust other drivers...NEVER.
A couple days back, I was changing lanes, had my signal on, looked back over my shoulder, made eye contact with the other drivers and made my lane change. One of the other drivers, whom I had made eye contact with, decided to make the lane change also, right off my back tire.

Basically, we are invisible, as posted in earlier post. DO NOT FORGET THIS!

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post #42 of 103 Old 04-10-08, 17:56
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I have a few lessons learned from my own first time rider days:

First, I agree with several posters who have suggested that first time riders stick to a 500cc or 250cc bike. My first bike was a used Ninja 500, which I dropped twice. Neither was a bad drop. One drop was in a parking lot the day after I finished the MSF course. I hit a patch of sand/gravel in the parking lot and the back wheel just slid out. The second was when some idiots in a cage came through a turn half way in my lane and I drove off the road trying to avoid them. I managed to slow down but still flopped over when I hit the soft shoulder. The point being, I never felt too bad about dropping the bike because it was used and not my "dream" bike. I have never dropped my Daytona or my FZ6 (same cannot be said for the R6, but that is a story for another day). In addition to that, a smaller bike generally offers a riding position that is more comfortable, which means less distraction for a new rider. They are generally lighter, and generally less tippy because the rake angle is less aggressive. These are all good things for a first time rider.

Second, after you take the MSF course (which I believe should just be a given) don't practice in an empty parking lot. As noted above, I dropped my first bike in a parking lot the day after the course. Several of my friends have also dropped bikes practicing in parking lots. I thought practicing in a parking lot would be smarter, since there would not be any traffic, but I discovered parking lots are actually harder to deal with physically than the street. Bikes are much more stable once you get them above about 15mph and in most parking lots you do not have enough room to safely get above those speeds. Parking lots also demand that you make sharper turns. I say the best way to practice is find a neighborhood near where you live that has little traffic and speed limits in the 25-35 mph range. Drive around the neighborhood in a controlled fashion. This will allow you to practice using the clutch, brakes, throttle, gear shift, etc. without having to work so hard to keep the bike on balance. The key here though is to take it nice and easy. You don't want to run over somebody's child or dog while your screaming through a neighborhod. Your first few practice runs don't need to be long either. The first few times I rode on the street I was so tense that everything ached after ten minutes. Keep doing the short practice runs until you really feel comfortable starting, stopping, and turning both right and left at intersections and at speed. Then, when you are able to operate your bike without having to focus on the mechanics of riding a bike, and you are feeling like you are in control, add in some time on faster streets. The practice will get you to the point where you can devote the majority of your attention to not being cut off, or surprised by a cager pulling out in front of you or stopping short.

Oh, one other thing. When you are feeling confident enough to get your Daytona 675 and attack the street full out...don't. Definintely get the Daytona, but bring it to the track and run it "full out" there. My feeling is you're much safer running at the edge of your personal limits in a controlled environment than out on the streets where you never know what might be around the next bend.
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post #43 of 103 Old 04-11-08, 18:15
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who is a newby

riding for 3 years does not constitute you as an intermediate rider. I am 32, been riding for 15 years and I am STILL a "Newby". Come on fellas, how about we get past this noob or newby crap. I am pretty sure if I was looking at this site as a potential member I would most definately be turned off by all this noob junk. Every posting seems to be talking about noobs, just like this one.
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post #44 of 103 Old 04-11-08, 18:29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freezy View Post
riding for 3 years does not constitute you as an intermediate rider. I am 32, been riding for 15 years and I am STILL a "Newby". Come on fellas, how about we get past this noob or newby crap. I am pretty sure if I was looking at this site as a potential member I would most definately be turned off by all this noob junk. Every posting seems to be talking about noobs, just like this one.
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post #45 of 103 Old 04-12-08, 03:28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juggz675 View Post
j2theoshgosh

Wow, that post needs some buttet points .

Something else not mentioned:
When changing lanes NEVER...NEVER trust other drivers...NEVER.
A couple days back, I was changing lanes, had my signal on, looked back over my shoulder, made eye contact with the other drivers and made my lane change. One of the other drivers, whom I had made eye contact with, decided to make the lane change also, right off my back tire.

Basically, we are invisible, as posted in earlier post. DO NOT FORGET THIS!
Yes i agree, the problem is, even wen they see you, they dont respect you because they think motorcycles are dangerous..... but its idiots like them who think that way and dont give a shit that makes it dangerous !
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post #46 of 103 Old 04-12-08, 03:29
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Freezy get the banana out ur mouth and get real, u chimp

people that come here sometimes have never ridden anything but a pony. and then wanna ride a stallion like the 675, they will find anything useful.

u been here since dec and ur post # gives u no respect.

and u got an 08, how much experience do u have on the bike ? 20 miles ? do u know what type of tires come with the bike ? lol .......... u prob open the gas tank cap and sniff the fumes all day. ur not a squid, ur a new born noob

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post #47 of 103 Old 04-12-08, 04:34
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post# respect?

thejosh, congratulations on your keen PI skills. I do apologise for my lack of posting numbers and therefore my lack of 'respect'. I only wanted to treat people on this site as adults and not subordinates that don't know the front end of a bike from the other. The 675 is indeed a fantastic bike and I believe that it is certainly something to behold. However, it is a bike and only that.
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post #48 of 103 Old 04-12-08, 04:56
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yea sorry about that i know what ur trying to say. wen i posted that, it was a long time before cigars, u understand

yea but some noobs have no idea what a tire is. i can understand someone like me who is mechanically inclined getting affended, but the thread does say noobs. And if u cant roll with the punches, what kindof use are u here. I was harassed like crazy 1st day, i loved it, because i threw punches back, hence why they banned me for 2 days. in the process of rolling with the punches and throwing punches i feel as if, to say, part of the family here.

If they cant take a nooby thread, then thats pretty sad.

It is my understanding that people come on and ask the same damn questions over and over, this is why this thread was made, noobs to the site come here, read parts of this, get an over view, and then ask questions afterwards if not answered here.

The reason i posted so deeply was simply due to the fact, i have been hearing many horror stories of wrecks and accidents on the 675. This got to the point ware i decided, hey, i havent even had a scratch on mine yet, why not give some pointers. Check ur bike for fluid leaks, stuff like that. I was un aware of this till my gas line cracked and spilled gas all over the back tire, then i found out 2 miles down the road wen i was leaned into a turn and hit the gas, didnt crash, but easily could have.

If nothing more than basic riding tips, going over what u already know never hurt anyone. Actually isnt that what studying is ? reviewing material over and over and over so its stuck in your head.

There is nothing wrong with tyring to keep fellow riders safe, bikers look out for eachother, even after all that jap bashing i do, ill ride with a jap bike anyday. I wish no harm on anyone on a bike and hope they come and see all these post, specially the cold tire post and dont have to find out $4,000 later end of riding season into next waiting for parts to arrive

so many people jump from dirt bike to 600 class.... some people straight to 600, many noobs on 600's..... if this was a 1,000cc forum or something, would have far fewer

just for laughs, if this was a 1,000cc bike and a newb came on, id tell him to try flooring it around a corner, will settle the bike, and give him more traction. lol No noob needs to be on a big cc bike rite away and should crash the bike into a tree before crashing into a group of little kids walking to school. lol....

i understand ware u are coming from, but thread says noob, rem that

Last edited by harveygraphite675; 04-12-08 at 05:03.
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post #49 of 103 Old 04-12-08, 20:28
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nice.....

thejosh, well well, that reply certainly smashed the old STFU response!

I guess some people get carried away (most definatley including myself on this one) with reading the same questions and same problems. Your point noted. Unfortunately I think some if not most of the "What The" questions in this forum are thrill seekers trying to draw out the people that actually do care.

SO.. Do I think that the 675 is a good first (very first) bike.?
Not a chance in hell.

I do believe however it is forgiving and MAYBE someone new to the bike with a lot of common sense and dexterity will simply blow their mind!
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post #50 of 103 Old 06-20-08, 16:03
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it is a purpose built bike. 2 weeks after msf i rode the front wheel from 80 to about 40mph before my rear wheel came back to earth. msf ftw! it sticks in the back of your head. it helps keep you aware like brain washing. you instantly become aware of the situation. msf is a must. the d675 was my first bike but i am very methodical and in my 30's. and i come from fast european cars and its what i do for a living. it just fits me. some people have no business riding a moto at all. if youre young and nervouse then wait till your 30. your mind will be in a different place. then again for some 30 isnt old enough. be responsible in your decision making when considering buying a d675 for a first bike. if you cant beat the monkey off your back then go ahead.
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