FAQ for new riders: please add to it! - Page 4 - Triumph675.Net Forums
General 675 discussion Anything related to the Triumph 675 model(s), and miscellaneous motorcycle talk.

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post #31 of 103 Old 03-03-08, 16:44
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Appreciate that man, I'm definately on your wavelength...
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post #32 of 103 Old 03-11-08, 14:13
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Great post!
Some of the books that are mentioned are available as pdf if you search the web correctly.. ;)

Regarding the question wether or not the D675 is a good first bike; Power is one thing, enough has been said about that. The seating position is the reason i wouldnt recommend it. That sporty bodyposition works best when you ride it like hell. But In my opinion youre not making it easier on your self learning the skills. I consider myself a somewhat experienced rider (70.000kms in 5 years) and i just recently bought a Street triple after riding a CBR600RR (and some other supersports). And the difference in seating position made riding a whole lot easier. It was like coming home, much more confidence. The view on traffic around me is much better and manouvring in most situations is a lot easier. You dont have so much strain on you arms, that makes them more relaxed wich results in better controll and feel of the bike.

Acknowledge the fact that riding a bike is very difficult and enjoy the learning process...it never stops. Thats what keeps me riding.

And by the way...it can be done..so far ive never dropped a bike (ask me again in a couple of years). The thing i find to work when prepping up for a ride is allways going by the same routine. Create your own thing and dont let anything get in between or distract you. That way you wont forget your discbrake lock and stuff like that and you're pumped with concentration by the time you ride away.
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post #33 of 103 Old 03-23-08, 00:42
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I'm also a "first timer" purchasing a D675. I did my MSF course last week, and intend to do many more as I gain more experience.

I test rode many of the "beginner" bikes (recommended bikes such as the SV650 and Ninja-650). I actually found the D675 much easier to manage than both of those two, and even the "friendly" 250s used on the MSF course. Basics like proper wrist position work wonders with "accidental" throttle screwups over bumps.

I suspect, and hope, that the key is self control. I drive a very fast car also, and it barely comes out of idle much of the time. I don't doubt that the D675 will be treated the same way - certainly initially.

Is this a waste of money on either front? Some may argue so. Is this a good first time bike? If I were a teenager, or even a "twenty something", overtaken by speed - absolutely not. Am I a little nervous about riding such a powerful machine? Yes. I'm nervous about leaving the safety cocoon of my car, with its steel bars, airbags, ABS, four tires... etc etc. Do any of us really *need* more than a 125?

Part of the fun is the exposure. The risk is something that can be controlled with good gear, sense, street awareness, and restraint. I certainly hope to be riding mine and having fun for years to come - and that doesn't need to be flinging it into curves on the edge of traction. That said, I have no experience to talk from.

EDIT: So, I spent more time reading this forum. I'm now inclined to cancel my order, and either just bail in general, or get "something else", whatever that is.

-Alistair

(In the spirit of this thread however - I'm new. This is my first post. Be nice to me!)

Last edited by alistair; 03-23-08 at 16:33.
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post #34 of 103 Old 03-24-08, 11:37
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Hi Alistair,

You seem to have a lot of concerns regarding this matter. I think it's fair to factor into the equasion a lot of what's said on these sites, but ultimately it has to boil down to how you feel inside. I would hazard a guess that a lot of the younger riders ( not all! )that post on this site would suggest something else, primarily because they feel if your not wringing the nuts out of this thing, why bother!
It's a valid point to a degree, but who's to say that after a period of familiararity you won't be able to get the most out of it. And besides, like me, that may not be the point of getting the bike in the first place. Lets face it, unless you do track days where the hell can you ride it to it's maximum potential?...
The only difference I can tell between you and me is, the first time I saw the bike I knew instinctively I had to have it, and i've done everything nescessary to achieve this, right or wrong it was a decision made with the heart. Your hesitation leads me to think your decision is based on other things!
I would say you should listen to the advice on sites like this, but recognise that everyone will have an opinion and sometimes those opinions aren't always given with your best interests in mind. Go with what you feel and what you really want. If it stirs you like it stirs me, then I would say definately go for it and don't concern yourself with what anyone else thinks.
Best of luck with your decision.
Clive.
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post #35 of 103 Old 03-28-08, 05:02
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Here's my bit for the Common good!

These little gems i remember from my training:

Keep practising the basics.

I practise emergency stops every time i ride.

When braking hard, keep your elbows bent, you will retain control of the bike. Lock your arms and you run out of options. (this one makes a huge difference to the riding experience!)

My instructor also told me 'Take responsibility for your actions, if you have a spill it is your fault.' If you analyze that statement you will find that it is 99% true. You have managed to get into a situation where an accident is possible /probable. Don't blame anyone else. I have been off enought times to have tested the validity of this one, and in each case i have been able to identify the action or lack of action that i had/hadn't taken that resulted in me hitting the deck!

Cheers,

Mark
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post #36 of 103 Old 04-06-08, 23:14
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Hi all. I thought I'd add the bits o knowledge I've gained in the past few years of riding.

I think many new riders approach a motorcycle thinking it can get you places faster and easier. This is a thinking problem that can end up a real physical problem shortly. There are so many things involved in riding a two wheeled vehicle that take more attention, and preparation than a car. Like some have mentioned before, knowing your 100% ready for the ride is the first part. Gearing up, pre-ride checks on your bike and self, assessing the road conditions, and a good mental clearance of anything bugging you are just the start before you ride off (even on a run down to the corner store). The one time you don't do any of these things will most likely be that ONE time you encounter something unexpected that you can't deal with. I've heard some riders say they've never had a close call, but I'm of the mindset that every time you ride it is a close call.

I know three riders who have had accidents in the past year. Two are experienced riders with 20 plus years of experience each, the other has 1 year of experience. They are all okay thankfully, but their outlook on their accidents is vastly different. The newer rider still talks about what the problem was and pretty much thinks it wasn't his fault. The experienced riders both talk about what they should've done instead, and blame themselves.

The Daytona 675 is my fifth bike, and I can say the temptation to do something stupid on it is almost too great. It's power, handling, and generally smooth demeanor at moderate speeds would easily lull me into a false sense of security if it had been my first bike. I've made plenty of mistakes on the bikes before it, but I was able to manage them luckily. I don't think I would have been so lucky if I had made any of those mistakes on the Triumph.

That being said, I still think of myself as newbie on any bike I get on that I haven't ridden before.

Thanks everyone else for the great advice! Ride safe and aware.
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post #37 of 103 Old 04-06-08, 23:41
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yea this info is Great, but, how do i endo using the back brakes ?
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post #38 of 103 Old 04-08-08, 19:15
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I've enjoyed this thread from the start..In the past 6 months I've read 3 out of the 4 books mentioned to learn more and I'm also participating in The Riders Workshop to become smoother at road riding where lots of curves are involved...
I've graced the pavement 3 times so far and all 3 have been my fault.

1. Do not carry loose clothing exposed on the back of a bike...when you pick yourself off the pavement you will see why when the sweatshirt is wrapped around the rear sprocket.
2. Do not attempt a turn too fast on wet pavement covered with wet leaves. I cracked my helmet on this one when my head snapped back hard.
3. Do not ride a bike with compromised tires..like say cracked sidewalls for instance. I lost a front tire completely off the rim on a spirited on ramp...Leaned it over...gave it the gas and the front tire was gone...very disconcerting...Interesting thing is that the bike was inspected the day before at the Yammy dealer's ....

In all cases I was geared up and came up with no damage...just mad at myself...Two of my friends went down wearing gym shorts and sneakers...They don't ride anymore...
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post #39 of 103 Old 04-09-08, 08:39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefff1 View Post
I've enjoyed this thread from the start..In the past 6 months I've read 3 out of the 4 books mentioned to learn more and I'm also participating in The Riders Workshop to become smoother at road riding where lots of curves are involved...
I've graced the pavement 3 times so far and all 3 have been my fault.

1. Do not carry loose clothing exposed on the back of a bike...when you pick yourself off the pavement you will see why when the sweatshirt is wrapped around the rear sprocket.
2. Do not attempt a turn too fast on wet pavement covered with wet leaves. I cracked my helmet on this one when my head snapped back hard.
3. Do not ride a bike with compromised tires..like say cracked sidewalls for instance. I lost a front tire completely off the rim on a spirited on ramp...Leaned it over...gave it the gas and the front tire was gone...very disconcerting...Interesting thing is that the bike was inspected the day before at the Yammy dealer's ....

In all cases I was geared up and came up with no damage...just mad at myself...Two of my friends went down wearing gym shorts and sneakers...They don't ride anymore...

You have inspired me in so many ways. your accidents tho i sympathize for the pain they caused..... are funny, i just pictured each one rite after the other. Very odd about the sweatshirt, and the head flying back and cracking the helmet, just trying to picture wat was runnen threw ur mind as that happened. and the tire that wasnt there, incredibly funny....... i duno maybe its the fact i been up all night writing an essay and looking for a laugh.




nawwww its funny

Last edited by harveygraphite675; 04-10-08 at 05:41.
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post #40 of 103 Old 04-09-08, 08:53
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things not to do

Dont speed on a road u are unfamiliar with....... dont ride to close behind someone, dont let someone ride to close behind you. Check a road for cops and obstacles before flying down it. Dont want to fly threw a turn and halfway threw see oil on the road, or sand, or salt, watever. Make sure ur tires are warm, doing the road check should get them nice and warm. Dont go out wen the deer come out, so many people hit deer here because of that. Stay in your lane. Dont try to keep up with the group leader if you cant...... dont show off....... dont ride fast after dark. Dont push the bike 100% on the street, always know ware the car behind u is, try to know what the guy is thinking in the car behind you. Dont speed up to 120mph to make a pass wen u can pass at 70.......... Dont ride between cars, unless there is traffic and u are inching your way threw. Always keep in mind, u are invisible to drivers, if you see a side street, and a car sitting there, or pulling up to merge onto the road u are on, slow the **** down. Early morning the roads are always more slippery. Rite after a rain storm, even if the roads look dry, they are still slick. Keep off the yellow and white paint. When leaning into a corner on the street, go from outside to middle, gives you better site threw the turn and helps incase someone is slightly over there line coming the opposite direction. Dont ride wheelies when cars are around you, all it takes is a good wind, and ur 1 lane over. Dont ride wheelies for long distances, the front tire will stop rotating and wen brought down sometimes results in loss of control. dont let other people ride your bike, they will most likely drop it, seen it so many times. Stay in gear at a light, incase some idiot comes flying up behind u, have an escape route. dont look at sexy girls walking down the sidewalk, i did it once and ended up running a stop light on accident. most important, know ur boundries, know the bikes A great way to get a feel for the bike, is in a parking lot, an empty one. Try using the brakes, go 60 down to 0. . . know how long it takes your bike to stop, what it feels like when ur tires are about to break traction, and get used to it. Will save u from many an accident. Dont go hard on the throttle on a bumpy road, it will either, wheelie up, wheelie up and pull a tank slapper on u, or just cause u to whipe out. There is no reason to be abouve 80mph leaned into a turn, on the street that is. dont even bother riding wen the sun is coming down, drivers will not see you !!! focus on the road, dont let your mind wander. never ride tired. Always keep in mind, is it worth going down and seeing my bike in pieces for a turn ? Check tire pressure constantly. make sure you give the bike some time to run before hitting high rpms. do a quick, look around the bike, make sure nothing is loose, nothing is leaking. make sure you change the oil frequently, dont trust the mirrors on the bike 100%, if u can, do a shoulder check. If there is strong wind coming lean against it to maintain a straight line. Rev the bike instead of horn, its louder and draws more attention. Always make sure ur helmet strap is buckled or tied, watever the style. if u ever do go down at low speeds, try to roll, it will prevent u from getting broken bones. if u have a choice, try to save the bike, or jump off to safety, just jump the hell off. lol...... Dont be a dick and wear a salad bowl helmet, doesnt even look cool. if u ever are in a high speed accident, God help you. dont push your bike if there are guard rills alongside the road, they will cutt u in half, seen it on i87. if the throttle ever gets stuck wide open, just turn the key pull in the clutch and use the brakes. only happened to be twice, but on a different bike. Use primarily front brakes when stopping. dont ever just force the front brake hard, this will cause the front to slip out, or an endo. Dont do endos unless u like replacing the front fork and warping the frame. dont ride with 1 hand, if u hit a bump and lean back, so does the throttle. dont be in 4th gear for a 2nd gear turn, if u happen to come in to fast, now the gear wont reduce ur speed. Never touch the front brake in a turn. get all ur braking done before the turn, dont use full throttle till ur bike is uprite again

Last edited by harveygraphite675; 04-09-08 at 09:23.
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