FAQ for new riders: please add to it! - Page 2 - Triumph675.Net Forums
General 675 discussion Anything related to the Triumph 675 model(s), and miscellaneous motorcycle talk.

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post #11 of 103 Old 06-08-07, 04:09
Colombo
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Re: Smart Riding

Quote:
Originally Posted by decipral
AWARENESS IS KEY .There is nothing else that will save your ass. Be aware of your surroundings at all times.
So simple but undervalued.

A quick tip coming from experience. If you're at the head of the line at a red light, do what your mom always warned you to do and look both ways before proceeding through when it turns green.

I did not remember my dear old mom during the start of a ride and came within 10 feet of being pancacked by an oblivious driver as she blew through her red, never having realized it, leaving me stopped in the middle of the intersection. I lmost turned around and went back home at that point, but I pressed on... with a little less in my luck bag, and a little more in the experience bag :D
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post #12 of 103 Old 06-08-07, 13:25
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Drinking

Here is another good one.
DON'T EVER DRINK AND RIDE!!!!!!!!

FORMER RIDE:CBR F4i- Gone But Not Forgotten
#223 Graphite Grey Daytona 675
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post #13 of 103 Old 06-08-07, 13:29
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AND, DON'T DO DRUGS AND RIDE!!!

My last two Malibu rides involved stops at social lookout points where I noticed other riders tokin' up... I would never do that while riding! You need your wits about you!

R.I.P.
Daytona 675
June 3, 2006 - June 27, 2010
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post #14 of 103 Old 06-11-07, 06:53
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:lol: Very good post and it all boils down to experience and the only way to get it is saddle time and lots of it. I class myself as a intermediate rider and I have been riding for 33 years of my 36 years on this earth the first 13 years a very mixed off road, enduro, riding and at 16 years off age I got my license for and get this, a 50cc motor bike and that was all that the law allowed me to ride with until I turned 18 years in this two years I covered a healthy 37000 od km. I then got my big bike license and been doing road riding ever since I have been only in one major accident and it was in 2002 a woman cage rider skipped a traffic light and T-boned me on the right hand side and that is it, touch wood and this is majorly due to a very defensive riding style I hope other wise I am very very lucky but luck is not high in our family. So experience comes with saddle time enjoy riding that is what its all about, and one day when I think I am experienced enough I would like to work a track session or two through cheers bulletmp.
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post #15 of 103 Old 06-12-07, 15:41
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Great post here!

First I'll start off with, I classify myself as a novice rider.
Why? It was a very long time before I got back in the saddle ( no bad reasons, sold old bike, never got a new one after we moved). So I rank myself very low. Now I have 7500 on the daytona.

valoflyby mentioned to keep you distance. There is one thing he did not mention in this, if you are riding somebody's bumper, you WILL NEVER SEE a gaterback in the road, a pothole, etc....

As my racer friend has told me time and time agin, when you are in traffic, drive your bike like your car ( abiet a little faster ).

Do the reading, take the courses, go to the track ( which I still have to do ), have fun, be safe.

Face it, every time we go out, if we are not 100%, we are taking a greater risk. Don't just look at the cars around, LOOK AT WHAT THE PPL ARE DOING IN THOSE CARS!. I try to get away from the soccer mom(dad) in the minivan, talking on the cell. Texters ( god those ppl irritate me), cars with a lot of damage, Volvo's, SUV's etc.

Personally I'd perfer a ticket vs being stuck in middle of all those obstacles. Riding faster than traffic is not aggressive ( unless you're riding like a squid ) 10mph is not a bad thing, it gets you through the junk and into the open.

Tornado Red - I think I'll call her Flicka (:D)

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De Oppresso Liber


No good decision was ever made in a swivel chair - Gen. George S Patton


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post #16 of 103 Old 06-22-07, 12:50 Thread Starter
Sarchi
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Bump for the FAQ

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post #17 of 103 Old 07-05-07, 14:36
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Beginners

Actually, I think most people riding on the street today don't belong on a bike at all. Unless you have some real motocross/dirt riding under your belt, just stay away from the race bikes. Yes, you will dump the bike; everyone does sooner or later. I am tired of seeing and reading about kids and adults dieing on the street. Most riders donít even understand counter steering. These bikes are NOT for beginners. I have been riding and racing since I was 8 and now have 30 years combined dirt and street riding experience. I never understood why someone with no experience would buy a R1 or R6 and feel that dealers should exercise some restraint when selling these machines.
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post #18 of 103 Old 07-05-07, 15:00
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my opinion is that there should be another level of endorsement to ride sportbikes on the road (within the united states). In Michigan, there are 3 levels of achievement that new drivers have to achieve to recieve their driver license, I think it should be expressed in the same matter to obtain their CY endorsement.

I agree with everyone that it's just plain stupid to have a noob buy a middleweight or bigger sportbike. But they look just way too cool to not buy one as a new guy. The dealerships don't give a shit who buys the bike, they want to make the sale and move as many units as possible.

I beleive that it's up to the states to decrease the amount of crashes and fatalities by displaying some kind of interest in making a CY endorsement harder to obtain and monitored better. For example, Level 1 could be riding a motorcycle 500cc or smaller for 1 year or 200 hours...blah blah blah...

As Biker Boyz says, there are 2 kinds of riders, those who have been down and those who are gonna go down.

nate
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post #19 of 103 Old 07-05-07, 15:18 Thread Starter
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Re: Beginners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ric
I never understood why someone with no experience would buy a R1 or R6 and feel that dealers should exercise some restraint when selling these machines.
Actually for at least the last 2-3 years Yamaha (in Canada anyhow) has put some pretty blatant disclaimers on the R1 and R6 -- "This is a high performance sport bike and is not intended for beginners" or something to that effect. Same for the new FZ1 I believe.

But of course you can still buy one with your M2 license. :roll: Not the case in Europe...

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post #20 of 103 Old 07-28-07, 01:39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by punkindave
You'd be surprised, new riders and folks bitten by the go fast bug can be sponges for printed material to read while not riding (even if they normally only read cereal boxes)!!! The tips in these books will save someone from doing "unintentional landscaping" on the road!!
Ok, the standards (IMHO) are in suggested order of read:
Motorcycling Excellence - MSF (Color and lots of pictures)
Proficient Motorcycling - David Hugh (Humorous and very unintimidating)
Total Control - Lee Parks (Focusing on speed basics without a lot of math)
SPort Riding Techniques - Nick Ienatsch (More indepth)
and of course
A Twist of the Wrist I & II - Keith Code (Speed class 101 & 201)

Any other good ones?? Maybe make some newbie tips and references a sticky??
Dave had listed this when asked, in the Introductions thread

Hope you don't mind me putting these here Dave! :2tu...
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