Wheel Bearing Check - Triumph675.Net Forums
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post #1 of 13 Old 03-17-19, 22:35 Thread Starter
JonyB
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Wheel Bearing Check

Hey guys,

So whilst doing my yearly service, I checked bearings on both front and rear wheel and I found an enormous difference between front and rear wheel bearings...

I check the bearings by removing the wheels out and spinning each bearing, to see if they spin freely, if there's any binding or tight spots, etc. So in order to make the bearings spin, I wedge my finger(s) on the bearing and then rotate, and the difference in resistance between front bearings, and rear bearings is very noticeable... Front bearings are a lot harder to rotate, whereas rear bearings spin quite easily. I couldn't find any tight spots or binding or anything like that, on any of the bearings, so my first thought was that all is good, but considering the difference, I now start to wonder if there's anything wrong with the front bearings / wheel...

Did a quick search here and couldn't find any answer.

Also I do understand that this is a bit of a subjective question as you guys won't be able to have a "feel" for it, and gauge it for yourselves...

Just hoping that anyone out there has experienced something similar, and appreciate any comments.

Thanks guys!

Life's so much better on a bike!

Street Triple R 2011
ZX9R C2 (1999)
HEL || JayBee Biker Bits || STOMPGRIP || MOTUL
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post #2 of 13 Old 03-18-19, 01:46
MacBandit
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I almost never worry about how much tension is required to rotate them as depending on the manufacturer of the motorcycle they are often slightly sideloaded until the axle is torqued. The way I check is wheel on the ground thumbs in the bearing holes pressing down on the bearings and pushing the wheel back and forth with my thumbs. No roughness or notches they’re good to go. The reason I use that method is some manufacturers the bearings are so loaded that you can’t turn them without a lot of pressure. The other limiting factor is the grease. High end bearings usually have a very high quality low viscosity grease but OEM bearings tend to generate a bit more heat and have a higher viscosity grease in them.
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post #3 of 13 Old 03-18-19, 23:22 Thread Starter
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I almost never worry about how much tension is required to rotate them as depending on the manufacturer of the motorcycle they are often slightly sideloaded until the axle is torqued. The way I check is wheel on the ground thumbs in the bearing holes pressing down on the bearings and pushing the wheel back and forth with my thumbs. No roughness or notches they’re good to go. The reason I use that method is some manufacturers the bearings are so loaded that you can’t turn them without a lot of pressure. The other limiting factor is the grease. High end bearings usually have a very high quality low viscosity grease but OEM bearings tend to generate a bit more heat and have a higher viscosity grease in them.
So if I'm understanding correctly, you're saying that with a "cold" wheel, it is kind of expected that the resistance of the bearing to rotation will be greater than on a "hot" wheel, because of the grease that is...

I'm not 100% sure, but would say that both front and rear bearings are still OEM originals. If this is the case, I shouldn't have any differences between front and rear, based on different greases, right? Can it be that the difference is due to a different wheel hub (front to rear)?

Anyway, I definitely have no notches / roughness / binding / etc., so I'm inclined (for now) to leave it as is and check again soon after a few rides.

Thanks!!

Life's so much better on a bike!

Street Triple R 2011
ZX9R C2 (1999)
HEL || JayBee Biker Bits || STOMPGRIP || MOTUL
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post #4 of 13 Old 03-18-19, 23:25
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Correct hot equals less friction. I wouldn’t worry about the difference. Did you check the sprocket carrier as well?
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post #5 of 13 Old 03-19-19, 22:38 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBandit View Post
Correct hot equals less friction. I wouldn’t worry about the difference. Did you check the sprocket carrier as well?
Thank you so much!!!

Actually didn't check the sprocket carrier... and unlike my ZX9R, it doesn't come off that easily... Anyway, something to check soon(ish)

Life's so much better on a bike!

Street Triple R 2011
ZX9R C2 (1999)
HEL || JayBee Biker Bits || STOMPGRIP || MOTUL
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post #6 of 13 Old 03-19-19, 23:15
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So you know the sprocket carrier is typically the first bearing to go. I’ve had to replace those but not the rear wheel bearings.
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post #7 of 13 Old 03-20-19, 06:52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBandit View Post
the sprocket carrier is typically the first bearing to go.

What kind of mileage ballpark are we talking about here?
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post #8 of 13 Old 03-20-19, 09:53
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Unfortunately I don’t know thy were both off a track bike.
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post #9 of 13 Old 03-25-19, 23:28
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Has anyone had any experience the All Balls bearings?

I have a 2010 Daytona that I mostly ride on the street, but take to the track 3 - 4 times a years.

Are the stock ones better?

Thanks
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post #10 of 13 Old 03-25-19, 23:54
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I’ve used all balls in a lot of things. Yes stock is better. I can’t say for sure but I don’t think all of the All balls bearings get enough grease. If I use them again in the future I’ll pop the dust cap off and pack my own grease in them.
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