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-   -   Lowering by modifying seat sub frame (https://www.triumph675.net/forum/showthread.php?t=222721)

Guest675 10-20-16 07:35

Lowering by modifying seat sub frame
 
I am new here, I don't have a 675 (yet) and I want to know if the 675 Daytona or the street triple can be drastically lowered by modifying the seat sub frame? It looks possible, but I have never heard of it being done.
Suspension lowering kits just won't give me enougth lowering - I am v. short and more used to riding cruisers.

Plasmablaster 10-20-16 08:19

If there is a shop nearby with aluminum welding ability I believe you could do it. It would involve a lot of trial and error though as the components that are fitted on the sub-frame are designed to fit with that subframe and if you cut & lower it then it'll probably be a tough call having them fit again. It would also ruin the re-sale value of the bike.

Personally I wouldn't bother. If the lowering kit allows you to place your toes and front part of the foot on the ground you are good to go. Lowering the front could also help you a little and if you have lowered the back considerably it should be done anyway in order to retain steering geometry.

As an ultimate solution I would try to modify the seat instead of the sub-frame. You could win half an inch or so if you are willing to remove a bit of foam and having a bit of a harder seat.

MGFChapin 10-20-16 12:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plasmablaster (Post 4772281)
As an ultimate solution I would try to modify the seat instead of the sub-frame.

This. Shave the seat and get lowering links and you should be able to get at least one foot firmly down.

UAV 10-20-16 15:10

Not to be rude here.. but rather than drastically modifying the bike, why not modify your technique? I have pretty short legs, too.. so early on I learned to shift my butt across the saddle when I need to put a foot on the ground. I haven't been able to "flatfoot" any of my bikes, since my first.. which was a 400cc scooter. The Ninja 300 was the other exception, at least before I upgraded the stock suspension.. which sucked. That's the thing about lowering a bike.. you lose suspension travel and compromise handling. Why ride a sportbike at all then?

Anyway, I would suggest making your transition on a cheaper sportbike or dual-sport.. preferably one that's been pre-dropped by the previous owner so you don't have to worry about it. And practice, practice, practice. Then once your confident enough to handle the bike---especially at low speeds---without using your feet as outriggers, then go out and get your dream 675.

Glocken 10-21-16 10:16

Quote:

Originally Posted by UAV (Post 4772377)
Not to be rude here.. but rather than drastically modifying the bike, why not modify your technique? I have pretty short legs, too.. so early on I learned to shift my butt across the saddle when I need to put a foot on the ground. I haven't been able to "flatfoot" any of my bikes, .

seriously, I never understood this. The only time I've ever wished I could flat foot both my feet was during a crazy windstorm where I was getting tossed and fighting the bike at a stoplight.

jairaj 12-09-17 09:44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plasmablaster (Post 4772281)
If there is a shop nearby with aluminum welding ability I believe you could do it. It would involve a lot of trial and error though as the components that are fitted on the sub-frame are designed to fit with that subframe and if you cut & lower it then it'll probably be a tough call having them fit again. It would also ruin the re-sale value of the bike.

Personally I wouldn't bother. If the lowering kit allows you to place your toes and front part of the foot on the ground you are good to go. Lowering the front could also help you a little and if you have lowered the back considerably it should be done anyway in order to retain steering geometry.

As an ultimate solution I would try to modify the seat instead of the sub-frame. You could win half an inch or so if you are willing to remove a bit of foam and having a bit of a harder seat.

well i am trying to make a bolt on bracket , which could be fixed to the main frame, and the sub frame bolted on to it. would lower the bike to more than three inches without affecting steering geometry. Currently this is in the cad design stage , but I am certain this could be and will be done without cutting , welding or scratching anything on the stock bike. you just need two additional chromed bolts and a bit of re doing the seat to blend in with the gaps.

Plasmablaster 12-10-17 21:19

Quote:

Originally Posted by jairaj (Post 1869581442)
well i am trying to make a bolt on bracket , which could be fixed to the main frame, and the sub frame bolted on to it. would lower the bike to more than three inches without affecting steering geometry. Currently this is in the cad design stage , but I am certain this could be and will be done without cutting , welding or scratching anything on the stock bike. you just need two additional chromed bolts and a bit of re doing the seat to blend in with the gaps.

Three inches!

This is more than drastic. Have you ensured that the motion of the rear wheel (due to suspension operation) is guaranteed to not touch the lowered subframe & attached components after such a drastic lowering?

Also the tank (and perhaps the footpegs too) will be very-very high in relation to your body and it may cause discomfort.

If you need such a lot of lowering I'd suggest a combination of rear link & subframe lowering so that you won't need 3 inches on the subframe alone.

jairaj 12-22-18 13:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guest675 (Post 4772273)
I am new here, I don't have a 675 (yet) and I want to know if the 675 Daytona or the street triple can be drastically lowered by modifying the seat sub frame? It looks possible, but I have never heard of it being done.
Suspension lowering kits just won't give me enougth lowering - I am v. short and more used to riding cruisers.

It could be done. I am designing an adapter to offset the subframe by two inches. so the bolts go to the subframe and the adapter and the extra set of holes will align with the main frame. Hopefully it should work without too much of nuclear research.

Phantom49 03-06-19 17:27

Triumph made a lowered gel seat. I have one on mine and it's still comfortable enough without being a board.

I have a 30" inseam and am able to stand on the balls of my feet.

Before dropping the subframe 3", I would put the bike up on a stand, and with some help, raise the tank up to see where that is going to hit your torso. Every bump in the road may become a punch to the bottom of your rib cage.

Doing this mod will completely change the way the bike handles because it changes where your weight is distributed. There's a reason the factories didn't go crazy changing riding positions when they were doing updates on the supersport bikes every 2 years. They would move the seat up or down by 3mm, not 3 inches.

Good luck

Glocken 03-07-19 09:52

I have a 28" inseam and ride it just the way it is.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Phantom49 (Post 1869626573)
Triumph made a lowered gel seat. I have one on mine and it's still comfortable enough without being a board.

I have a 30" inseam and am able to stand on the balls of my feet.

Before dropping the subframe 3", I would put the bike up on a stand, and with some help, raise the tank up to see where that is going to hit your torso. Every bump in the road may become a punch to the bottom of your rib cage.

Doing this mod will completely change the way the bike handles because it changes where your weight is distributed. There's a reason the factories didn't go crazy changing riding positions when they were doing updates on the supersport bikes every 2 years. They would move the seat up or down by 3mm, not 3 inches.

Good luck



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