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post #11 of 30 Old 08-20-14, 15:10
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I raced 2006 675 for 2 seasons and loved it when I got the geometry and suspension sorted. I just bought a 2014 675R for the road and track days and think it's a vast improvement stock although I'm still running it in. I did work at a suspension tuning shop with one of the world's best so I really had an advantage (he's also a 5 time national champion and raced wild card 250cc grand prix in the early nineties).
I found it was extremely sensitive to front / rear ride heights. Even a mm difference made a huge difference. You're on the right track raising the forks. I would also take a link out the chain and get that wheelbase as short as possible (massive difference and able to hold a really tight line).
Also, and this applies to all bikes, get some light fork springs in the front (9kg) and really soften the front compression. It gives you that feel that you're after and you can carry huge speed in the turns and hold a tight line. Don't try and control fork dive on the brakes with hard springs and compression, control that with air gap.
I was given a brand new 2008 R6 to race and gave it back after one session on the track, the triumph was too good out the turns with its torque and corner speed was immense.
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post #12 of 30 Old 08-22-14, 08:34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisky View Post
I raced 2006 675 for 2 seasons and loved it when I got the geometry and suspension sorted. I just bought a 2014 675R for the road and track days and think it's a vast improvement stock although I'm still running it in. I did work at a suspension tuning shop with one of the world's best so I really had an advantage (he's also a 5 time national champion and raced wild card 250cc grand prix in the early nineties).
I found it was extremely sensitive to front / rear ride heights. Even a mm difference made a huge difference. You're on the right track raising the forks. I would also take a link out the chain and get that wheelbase as short as possible (massive difference and able to hold a really tight line).
Also, and this applies to all bikes, get some light fork springs in the front (9kg) and really soften the front compression. It gives you that feel that you're after and you can carry huge speed in the turns and hold a tight line. Don't try and control fork dive on the brakes with hard springs and compression, control that with air gap.
I was given a brand new 2008 R6 to race and gave it back after one session on the track, the triumph was too good out the turns with its torque and corner speed was immense.
Thanks for the reply buddy. This is all true.. I have been doin the same thing with my sprockets... I run 13-44 most of the time. Great point on using the suspension to get the feel you want, but stock, this bike needs some work to get to hold that line tighter. Def nice when you look and it goes exactly where you want it like a laser!

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post #13 of 30 Old 08-22-14, 09:37
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You will get there and it will be worth it. Not sure what class you're racing in but we run superstock rules where that midrange grunt out the corners was a huge advantage, corner speed was also higher. The issue I had with the first gen bike is that lack of weight at the rear which was terrible braking into downhill bends.
Don't forget that by running smaller sprocket to get your wheelbase shorter can mess with your chain/ swingarm pivot heights
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post #14 of 30 Old 08-22-14, 11:52 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisky View Post
I raced 2006 675 for 2 seasons and loved it when I got the geometry and suspension sorted. I just bought a 2014 675R for the road and track days and think it's a vast improvement stock although I'm still running it in. I did work at a suspension tuning shop with one of the world's best so I really had an advantage (he's also a 5 time national champion and raced wild card 250cc grand prix in the early nineties).
I found it was extremely sensitive to front / rear ride heights. Even a mm difference made a huge difference. You're on the right track raising the forks. I would also take a link out the chain and get that wheelbase as short as possible (massive difference and able to hold a really tight line).
Also, and this applies to all bikes, get some light fork springs in the front (9kg) and really soften the front compression. It gives you that feel that you're after and you can carry huge speed in the turns and hold a tight line. Don't try and control fork dive on the brakes with hard springs and compression, control that with air gap.
I was given a brand new 2008 R6 to race and gave it back after one session on the track, the triumph was too good out the turns with its torque and corner speed was immense.
Excellent feedback thanks! I normally run on the softer side for front springs, and the bike being as light as it is, I wonder if that is what is causing that heavy front end feeling.

My style is more smooth and high corner speeds vs point and shoot, so I normally don't run super hard front springs. Right now, with the bike completely stock (0.95kg springs in the front from what I've read), I still have about 25-30mm of fork travel left after a session, including a couple hard braking hairpins. I'm not sure what the stock oil height is, and I have the compression fairly soft as well, at 16 clicks out on the OEM Ohlins.

At 180lbs, I think the 0.90s will probably be better, at least it's the cheapest option before swapping triples etc. I actually don't mind the stock gearing currently for the tracks I am running on.
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post #15 of 30 Old 08-22-14, 12:52
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I was running either 0.9kg fork springs and either a 9.0 or 9.5 kg in the rear but like I said that was a 2006/7.
I'm still running in my '14 675R so haven't taken it on the track yet
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post #16 of 30 Old 12-08-14, 17:48 Thread Starter
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Still thinking of ideas now that it's the offseason. Has anyone used the triple clamps from a Street Triple on the 675R? Trail would increase to around 96mm. To accommodate the Ohlins on the 675R, I'd have to bore the lower triple out by 2mm.

I can get a machine shop to bore it out, but would it be safe?

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post #17 of 30 Old 12-08-14, 18:27
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Interesting thread, I hope to hear more from 13+ guys. I'm off an 09 which I loved and on a 13 for 2015. I haven't got it on the track yet, but did a few road rides on local twisties before I started to strip it down for track duty. The bike was so quick steering it scared me a little. It felt like one wrong bar input and the bike flies out from under me.

Interesting idea using the triples from a street.

I'm hoping I don't have to buy new triple clamps, so my first thing I try will be to drop the forks a couple lines.
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post #18 of 30 Old 12-09-14, 01:53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mszilves View Post
Still thinking of ideas now that it's the offseason. Has anyone used the triple clamps from a Street Triple on the 675R? Trail would increase to around 96mm. To accommodate the Ohlins on the 675R, I'd have to bore the lower triple out by 2mm.

I can get a machine shop to bore it out, but would it be safe?
I am having something special made for me.. will post link and pics soon as this will be what us racers have been looking for to correct the stiff front end the +'13 D675R notoriously have.

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post #19 of 30 Old 12-10-14, 13:14
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We've used the Attack clamps for the last few years, and the adjust-ability has been great. The newest style work extremely well.

The numbers I have on the Street Triple clamps would put trail closer to 92mm, which is better, but still not ideal.

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post #20 of 30 Old 12-10-14, 13:28 Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RidersDiscount View Post
We've used the Attack clamps for the last few years, and the adjust-ability has been great. The newest style work extremely well.

The numbers I have on the Street Triple clamps would put trail closer to 92mm, which is better, but still not ideal.
Thanks TJ, great info! Are the clamps in the pic the newest style? Can you PM a price on those to WA, 98338?

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